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Discussion Starter #1
I did a quick search and didn't see this on the forum. (which means it's probably been posted 20 times) I found it last year when the TPMS on my old car starting staying on. I didn't try it but thought it was interesting.

TPMS Canister article Hard working Truck Blog

Here's the important text:
"Making a pressurized TPMS cansiter is easy and cheap–probably less than 20 minutes in time and $10 in parts.

Take a six-inch piece of 2-1/2″ Schedule 40 PVC pipe and glue a cap on one end.Then slide in all four of your pickup’s TPMS valve stems/sensors into the pipe.

Install a short valve stem in the end of a second cap and glue it in place to make a sealed container.

Pressurize the TPMS container torecommended cold inflation psi on your truck’s door placard a (Schedule 40 PVC has an operating pressure of 180psi) and slide the container in the pickup’s glovebox or under a seat. That’s it.

The truck’s computer doesn’t know what the sensors are in—just that they are under pressure. So it “sees” the pressure is satisfactory and no warning lights go off until the container’s pressure drops below that preset factory threshold.

NOTE: Neither ProPickup nor it’s staff endorse the tampering with any safety devices/equipment on a vehicle. Doing the above means the vehicle’s owner assume all associated risks and liabilities. "
 

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This unreliable cheat won't work on a Ridgeline or any other make and model that uses an "initiator" next to each wheel that communicates with the closest tire pressure sensor. You'd have to make four of these canisters - each containing only one tire pressure sensor - and locate one next to each wheel well.

Even if it did work, a 6" piece of 2.5" pipe contains less than 30 cubic inches of air. A tire contains hundreds of cubic inches of air. Even the tiniest leak in the small canister will set off the TPMS sensor.

Also, not all vehicles with TPMS have pressure sensors. There are still lots of new vehicles with mandatory TPMS that compare the rotational speed of each wheel using the ABS hardware. Based on the principle that an under-inflated tire's diameter is slightly smaller and will turn slightly faster than the others, the computer can determine when a tire is low without actually measuring pressure. If your vehicle has a tire pressure "reset" or "calibrate" button, it probably doesn't utilize pressure sensors. My old '99 Regal had this setup as does the 2015 CR-V I'm currently driving. This method satisfies the requirement for TPMS, but cannot detect low tire pressure in the event multiple tires are equally under-inflated, such as occurs naturally over time.
 

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Not sure that'll work on the Ridgeline. It has four TPMS initiators (one in each wheelwell) so they are close to the transponders in the tires. They broadcast a radio signal which is used to power up the transponder, which then transmits it's pressure reading. If the transponders in the glovebox are too far away from the initiator, they wouldn't get the wakeup signal.

Low-Frequency RFIC Solutions for Tire-Pressure-Monitoring Systems | DigiKey

If you want to give it a try, no reason not to. Just be prepared to move the transponders back to the tires after they don't work. ;)

Chip H.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not going to try it just thought it was a different way to look at the issue. Evidently it works on some models as this wasnt' the only thread I found on it.


never mind... back to our regular programming...
 
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