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Discussion Starter #1
Don't have the truck yet but getting prepared. My boat tongue height is 18.5" when the boat is perfectly level. Trying to figure out what drop/lift I need for the RL.

Thanks
 

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The center of the Ridgeline receiver (unladen) is about 19" off the ground. Also figure that the hitch (back of the truck) will probably sag 1-1.5" depending on tongue weight of the trailer.

Depending on the weight of the boat, a 1" - 2" drop should work.

The vast majority of hitches seem to be 2" drop / 1" rise. Unless your boat is pretty heavy, a 2" drop would probably work just fine. If pretty heavy tongue weight, a 1" drop might be more suitable.

I've not towed with my G2 yet, so I don't have a good handle on sag, etc. Others here should be able to chime in with better info.

Edit: the typical ball is about 2-3/4" from base to top of ball. It will also depend on where you measure 18.5" from (top of trailer rail or bottom of trailer rail).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
13' Smoker Craft with a 25hp tiller. Boat (225) and motor (125) weigh 350lbs total. So you are thinking a 2" drop should do it?
 

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2" drop will be fine.

I had a 2" drop Reese hitch here that I just put in the Ridgeline receiver. With a 2" ball, it measures 20-1/8" to the top of the ball. Use that info as you will.
 

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We have a 13 foot smokercraft as well, with a 15hp tiller, on an EZloader trailer. We are using a 5 1/4" drop and run perfectly level. Do not recall the height of our boat tongue, but we bought the draw bar to match after we lined up the truck and boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We have a 13 foot smokercraft as well, with a 15hp tiller, on an EZloader trailer. We are using a 5 1/4" drop and run perfectly level. Do not recall the height of our boat tongue, but we bought the draw bar to match after we lined up the truck and boat.
Dealer tells me at level the LoadRite ball receiver sits 18.5” high.
You have the 14F 1000WT trailer?

So confusing.

405704
 

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Congrats on your new boat! Split seat FTW! Good choice. Our trailer is an EZB 12-14 1000. We bought ours 5 or 6 years ago, so some stuff may have changed ever so slightly.

That said, pulled out the measuring tape and the top of the boat receiver is about ~18 when level in the garage. The top of our ball with the 5 1/4 drop is ~17 when on the truck. So perhaps it is only "perfectly" level by eye and slightly tripped forward. We didn't put a level on it, but next time we hook up, I will if I can remember! In any case, here are some of our observations:

1) Air down the tires some on the trailer, as when we drove ours off the lot, it bounced like mad... it might have gotten air over some of the bridges on the interstate going the speed limit taking it home being towed by our CRV at the time.
2) It was hard to get enough tongue weight (~6% of total weight) with the way the boat sits with the motor and weight bias to the back. Perhaps this is a reason we have a slightly lower ball. We barely have enough tongue weight even with a spare tire strapped to the front of the trailer, our battery as forward as possible, and gear stashed up in the nose area.
3) Tie down the motor, or it will bounce around as well! Or at least ours did, especially over the expansion joints in the roads. We also strapped down the nose of the boat.
4) Highly recommend adding side bunks. Made loading super easy vs trying to center the two hull seams, on the flat bottom, onto the trailer bunks.

Have fun!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Dealer said the ball receiver was 18.5” so you are spot on.
You’ve given me a lot of great advice and things to think about. Air down - good tip!

I’m going to get what you recommended. Luckily, after I get the boat home - the trip from my house to the ramp is 1.5 miles and max speed limit is 25mph. I should be good at those speeds with very little tongue weight.


Huge help, thank you!!!!
 

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My SO says the trailer tires are at about 20-25psi or somewhere there about. We give the trailer a rock and squish test to see if it has a good spring. If it does, off we go. lol. And you're lucky your'e only 1.5 miles away from your fishing grounds. Should be fun!
 

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The winch stand is adjustable fore/aft.....forward will increase tongue weight and the opposit applies as well. Get the bathroom scales out. The winch strap pull should be a tad below the level of the eye. Doing so will keep the bow pulled down onto the trailer.

I find most people back the trailer too far down/deep, when loading the boat on the trailer. When backing the trailer down, stop when the tops of the fenders are just a tad out of the water. Drive the boat on the trailer just nestleing the bow on the bunks. Then signal the vehicle driver to back the trailer down another foot or so. Finish driving boat onto the trailer ‘til you feel the bow bump the winch roller. Fasten the winch strap to the bow eye and signal the vehicle driver to proceed slowly up the ramp.
 

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DBLXX, to expand a bit more on what silkiechicken has said...

We keep the boat trailer tires right around 24-25 psi. This allows for some compliance in the tires that reduces the hopping that the trailer does on bumpy roads. I wouldn't inflate over 30.

We also tie down the bow to the trailer as I've seen that bounce going down the road. In addition, I strap the bottom of the outboard (minimal tension) to the trailer to prevent bounce. Finally, we strap the tiller fully turned in one direction or another. Essentially, I try to keep everything statically loaded. No dynamic loads like bouncing, hopping, etc.

This boat and trailer combination is really light, and we would also get noise as the receiver and drawbar bounce around. To silence this, we use a hitch tightener. It's a much nicer way to tow the boat on longer trips, but may not be necessary if you're only going a few miles. We haven't needed to use the hitch tightener when we've pulled heavier loads, but I believe the tongue weight of our trailer is in the 30 lbs range, and that's with a spare tire mounted.

Enjoy the boat!
 

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Use a “transom saver“ when towing......the weight of the motor will be transferred to the trailer, not to mention getting the prop/lower unit up and out of the way of road debris while trailering.

 

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Use a “transom saver“ when towing......the weight of the motor will be transferred to the trailer, not to mention getting the prop/lower unit up and out of the way of road debris while trailering.

Good advice! However, this small boat and the geometries of the boat, trailer, and outboard to not support the use of a transom saver. We thought about this and searched around for solutions, but ended up being satisfied by keeping the motor from bouncing on the trim adjustment.
 

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Sounds like your trailer is too short or the boat needs to be moved forward on the trailer.
 

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I've used these before:


Redneck version is a short piece of 2x4 tied to a length of line.
 

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Not sure that takes any load off the transom when trailering. 🤷‍♂️
 

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@DBLXX

If you ever plan on going any further than the 1.5mi and more than 25mph, DO NOT under-inflate trailer tires. They are meant to be run at max psi. Inflate to that. They need high pressure b/c of their design in terms of sidewall performance - the most important aspect of a trailer tire. It is also how they dissipate heat effectively. The last thing you want is to a blow tire on the highway b/c you were causing the tires to heat up too much due to under-inflation.

As HRL383 says, use a Transom Saver. When traveling, the torque of a 125+ lb motor bouncing up and down with the road, on a transom that small, is not insignificant. I use one religiously.

When the boat is on the trailer, the bow eye needs to go UNDER the bow roller, and winched tight into the roller. That way, if you're in a head-on accident, the boat wont launch into the back of your tow vehicle.

Even though your boat & motor are light, any 1000-1200# trailer are for up to 14' craft, but more realistically, a 12'. The boat you pictured in post #7 is sitting pretty far back, which will affect how it handles behind the tow vehicle. I wouldnt want my boat that far back on the trailer. The center of weight should be at or, more correctly, just in front of the trailer's axle. Longer trailers track better and also are much easier to back up. If you look at my first image, there isnt much boat behind the trailer axle.

I have a 16'7" Alumacraft, with a Yamaha 25 on it (~600# with batteries). My trailer is a 19', 2500#-rated Karavan, with a 3500# axle on it. I bought this trailer b/c I run thousands of km's offroad, over heavily washboarded and potholed roads. I used to have a trailer about the same size as yours above here, but literally snapped the frame... 100kms out in the middle of nowhere... in the bush.... Getting that thing back to camp was... well... that's another story...
 

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