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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about to change tranny/transfer case/rear diff for my 2017 Touring and got the fluids from dealership today. Yes, I should've taken the time, but I was in a hurry so I just simply counted to make sure I had what I needed but wasn't able to double-check that all items were correct (parts guy seemed to know what he was doing since he was pretty quick). Anyway, I got home and finally checked, but for the transfer case they gave me 80W90. Manual calls for 75W85.

Do you guys think I am okay to proceed or should I go back to the dealership for an exchange? I live in Saskatchewan, Canada (goes down to -30C in the winter).
 

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As long as it’s GL-5 rated it’s probably fine but I wouldn’t use it in my vehicle. Why didn’t the dealer give you Honda HGO1?
 

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As long as it’s GL-5 rated it’s probably fine but I wouldn’t use it in my vehicle. Why didn’t the dealer give you Honda HGO1?
The only time I kept a Ridgeline long enough to need to change this oil, I discovered that my local dealer didn't even stock or use HGO-1. They used a generic brand that I'd never heard of. The weight was either the same or, as with the case of the OP, close.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
As long as it’s GL-5 rated it’s probably fine but I wouldn’t use it in my vehicle. Why didn’t the dealer give you Honda HGO1?
It is indeed GL-5 rated Honda brand hypoid gear oil. The back says it "meets sever weather conditions encountered in parts of Canada. 80W90 contains an extra high level of extreme-pressure additive ensuring full gear protection from -40C to +40C and beyond." Maybe that's why dealer gave me this. I honestly should've double-checked but I was in a rush.

The only time I kept a Ridgeline long enough to need to change this oil, I discovered that my local dealer didn't even stock or use HGO-1. They used a generic brand that I'd never heard of. The weight was either the same or, as with the case of the OP, close.
Such is the case for my 2004 Toyota 4Runner also. According to the manual, front diff needed 75w90 and rear diff 80w90. Turns out I can use the same 75w90. I figured these gears might be happy just having fresh lubrication at all.
 

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My G1's owner's manual specifies 90-wt. gear oil for the transfer case. Imagine my surprise when I learned that Honda's HGO-1 (at least in the USA) is 75W85!

On the one hand, I wouldn't worry about that small viscosity difference. The 75W85 is for fuel economy improvements vs. SAE90. The improvement is less vs. an 80W90, though it's definitely still there particularly in the cold.

On the other hand, you're in a fairly cool-cold place, ignoring arctic climates. That would make the 75W85 somewhat more desirable.

If it was mine, I might ask my dealer whether they had 75W85 to trade me for, but if they didn't, I'd probably put in what you have. It'll work and you're super unlikely to notice the difference. It's a bit hard to even find 75W85 gear oil with a GL-5 rating. Red Line makes one, and other than that you might have to use an OEM fluid from one of the dealers.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If it was mine, I might ask my dealer whether they had 75W85 to trade me for, but if they didn't, I'd probably put in what you have. It'll work and you're super unlikely to notice the difference. It's a bit hard to even find 75W85 gear oil with a GL-5 rating. Red Line makes one, and other than that you might have to use an OEM fluid from one of the dealers.
Thanks I will go back and check if they have HGO1 since I have to make that 40 minute drive for another errand anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update: I went back to the dealer and parts guy said 80W90 is what they use there. I thought that was interesting as it is not what the manual states. He touted that it was the better oil. I didn't want to argue because I do not have a huge knowledge-base on oil weight.
 

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Seems odd to me that they would use a heavier weight oil in Canada where one would expect operating conditions to be colder and cold flow to be more important. I'd personally stick to the manual weight if possible, but it'll probably be fine mechanically, just a little less efficient.
 
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