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So I drained my transmission and filled with the 4 quarts that the dealership/online info told me to use and now my transmission is overfilled. Is there a bunch of junk in my transmission taking up space or something? How can the dealership specs be so far off? Should I drain some out or is his a sign of a more serious problem?

I’ve checked the dipstick a couple times both on flat ground on different locations and it reads the same high while the vehicle is running.

408551
 

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When i did mine I did in my garage in January when it was cold from sitting overnight. I drained out 4 quarts (measured it) and put back in 4 quarts. My dipstick shows just over full sitting cold. Been running fine and that fluid is still nice and red when i checked it last week with 44,000mi on it and almost 15k since i changed it.
 

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i don’t think you check tranny fluid level when the motor is running. According to Honda, you check tranny fluid level within 60-90 seconds after turning the motor off. Be careful of hot parts.
 

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To check transmission fluid level, vehicle needs to be on level ground, warmed up, and engine OFF. Official specs are 3.3 quarts but the amount drained seems to depend on factors such as vehicle tilt. I typically make sure the level correct before the change out, and then drain, measure the amount drained, and then fill with the same amount of new fluid.
 

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.......measure what you drain, how logical is that.👌
 
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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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If you check the fluid level with the engine running, it will indicate higher than actual levels. The Honda automatic is not like conventional automatics that you check with the engine running. ALWAYS check the Honda 5AT and 6AT hot with the engine off and between 60-90 seconds of shutdown.
 
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Awesome info guys ! Thank you so much. Honda definitely has a learning curve. Lmao
 

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I would think the fluid level would be at it's lowest if checked with the motor running due fluid being pumped out of the bottom of the tranny to the top of the tranny. So......if level is high, motor running, it's got to be high when checked the Honda way and even a little higher when checked cold as in sitting overnight and checked.

I see <1/4" above top mark when checked cold and just a tic below the top mark when checked the Honda way. Never check with the motor running.

What is the correct TFT that gives the correct level reading? Tell us Honda.
 

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What is the correct TFT that gives the correct level reading? Tell us Honda.
Honda doesn't tell you the TFT, just how to perform the measurement (run engine until the radiator fan starts, turn engine off then read dipstick between 60-90 seconds later).
 

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Yep, I've read that......I was being facetious towards Honda. My manual doesn't even give a tranny fluid check procedure......it says take it to your dealer to have checked.
 

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I would think the fluid level would be at it's lowest if checked with the motor running due fluid being pumped out of the bottom of the tranny to the top of the tranny. So......if level is high, motor running, it's got to be high when checked the Honda way and even a little higher when checked cold as in sitting overnight and checked.

I see <1/4" above top mark when checked cold and just a tic below the top mark when checked the Honda way. Never check with the motor running.

What is the correct TFT that gives the correct level reading? Tell us Honda.

I too see about 1/4 above the full mark when cold. So that's two of us.
 

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I would think the fluid level would be at it's lowest if checked with the motor running due fluid being pumped out of the bottom of the tranny to the top of the tranny. So......if level is high, motor running, it's got to be high when checked the Honda way and even a little higher when checked cold as in sitting overnight and checked.

I see <1/4" above top mark when checked cold and just a tic below the top mark when checked the Honda way. Never check with the motor running.

What is the correct TFT that gives the correct level reading? Tell us Honda.
And you have guessed wrong. My Ridge was in the shop several years ago for a repair after a guy ran a stop sign and I tboned him. There was around $7000 damage to my Ridgeline, but I was fortunate to have a good shop do the repair.

When I checked the fluid levels when I got it back, the trans fluid was very low, near the bottom of the stick iirc. So I took it back to the shop that did the work and asked them about the discrepancy. I suspect they may have disconnected radiator lines during the repair.

After a few minutes, they called me back into the shop to show me that trans fluid levels were perfect. There sat my Ridgeline idling and they were checking it like a conventional automatic. I shut the engine down, then did a fluid level check and showed them how low the actual level was. I think they added about a quart of DW-1 or so to bring it back to nominal levels.

The interesting thing is that the body shop was part of the local Honda dealer's service facility and I was kinda shocked that a Honda shop didn't know how to properly check a Honda automatic fluid level.

But that incident told me that checking fluid like a conventional automatic with the engine running will give a false high reading.
 

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You missed my point.....I said in post #4 you don’t check tranny fluid level with the motor running. The reason being there is fluid splash/drainage on the dipstick when the motor is running, obviously giving a false reading. Hard to dispute the OP’s pic when checked running.

If you could eliminate the false dipstick splash/drainage reading when the motor is running, the fluid level would have to be lower. Fluid is pumped out of the sump/bottom of the tranny to the top of the tranny......fluid drains back to the sump when the motor is not running. The fluid level will rise on the dipstick as fluid drains back, motor off.
 

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You missed my point.....I said in post #4 you don’t check tranny fluid level with the motor running. The reason being there is fluid splash/drainage on the dipstick when the motor is running, obviously giving a false reading. Hard to dispute the OP’s pic when checked running.

If you could eliminate the false dipstick splash/drainage reading when the motor is running, the fluid level would have to be lower. Fluid is pumped out of the sump/bottom of the tranny to the top of the tranny......fluid drains back to the sump when the motor is not running. The fluid level will rise on the dipstick as fluid drains back, motor off.
Why are conventional automatics checked when running? Wouldn't the same issue affect them too?

However, your original point I referred to would seem logical... engine running logically should lower the dipstick reading. But it doesn't.
 

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When the engine is running, the fluid level in the sump is lowered. Dipstick readings are effected by splash/drainage.....Honda's dipsticks are not shielded from splash/drainage and other dipsticks are. Checking the dipstick 60-90 seconds after turning the motor off, fluid level is going to be almost the same as if the motor was running. Not much fluid will drain to the sump only 60-90 seconds after turning the motor off. Sounds to me like Honda wants their tranny fluid level checked almost like a so-called "conventional" tranny........but with-in a few seconds of the motor being turned off vs running.
 

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Awesome, you are a fart smeller, ahh smart feller. My 1st "real" job was a journeyman rodbuster.....back-breaking work, paid well, but not much to brag about.
 
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