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So, I’m thinking about replacing my beloved 2017 V6 Accord Touring with a more versatile vehicle, either a Ridgeline or an SUV (Passport/RAV4/Outback). I can’t decide which type of vehicle would be the best all-around from a daily-driven standpoint. I think the Passport is a better fit for the majority of my daily driving and hauling duties and the more desirable overall, but there are a few issues when the less frequent tasks come up. Namely, hauling 4x8 material, landscaping supplies, taking construction debris and other items to the dump, and moving the occasional larger piece of furniture or similar bulky item. With a Passport, these tasks would most likely require a trailer. I’m not opposed to purchasing a nice aluminum trailer eventually, but my small property doesn’t lend itself to storing said trailer anywhere super desirable. I could store it at my dad’s place, a 20-minute drive away, though. The 5,000lbs max towing of the Ridgeline or the Passport would be more than enough for my needs. The other SUVs on my list tow considerably less. The RAV4 Adventure can tow up to 3,500lbs, Gas Limited - 1,500lbs, and Hybrid Limited - 1,750lbs. The 2020 Outback 2.5 XT models can tow 3,500lbs. So a RAV4 or Outback could suitably tow an appropriately-sized trailer for my needs.

As for the Ridgeline as my sole vehicle, I’m a little concerned that not having that SUV convenience would bother me on a day-to-day basis. The narrow rear door opening would probably bother me a bit. I know the door checks can be swapped to enhance the opening, but still a bit tight if you’re in and out often. For carrying the bike, the extra length of the Ridgeline would present a challenge. Yes, I can use my existing 1Up-USA hitch rack, but that would make it almost impossible to parallel park at the park I frequent. I could make a custom bar for the bed and attach a fork mount to secure the bike, but I’d rather haul the bike without removing the front wheel. It just seems like the Ridgeline would require several concessions on a daily basis for a significant advantage occasionally. Not sure this is rational thinking, just where my head is at right now.

Anyone been through a similar decision? How about anyone that has gone from an Accord or similar to an SUV/Truck?
 

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Moving from a car to a truck is easier than moving from a truck to a car.

Once you have the truck you wonder how you got by without it. When the time comes to change the truck you KNOW you are going to miss having it.

It’s really pretty simple, but if you haven’t had a truck you won’t realize it.

Unless you want to haul a ton, or tow 6 thousand pounds, you won’t go wrong with a Ridgeline. It’s by far the best car/truck I’ve ever had. When driving it you’ll feel like you’re in a very smooth SUV. The best of both worlds.
 

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If you want to be ultimately practical, get a minivan. Most interior space vs size, best gas mileage vs size. You can haul more than a truck because you can load all the way to the front seats. I've hauled double garage door supports through the sunroof to the back of a van. Roll out a tarp and you can throw brush, grass and mulch in there. You can fit 4x8 sheets, albeit not perfectly flat. And it all stays dry and secure.

No?

An suv has significantly less interior space than a van, which then limits it's hauling capabilities. So you aren't comparing most versitile interior hauler vs exterior hauler.

Anything short of a 10 ton military truck is a compromise of sorts. I have a trailer, but that is a pita too. Go back and pick it up, uncover, hookup, check tires, check lights.

I have been running through this scenario ever since we ditched our family van. Only having cars and a trailer is not fun (your Accord could pull a 1,000 pound trailer). I am ultimately choosing a truck for the awkward size and gross stuff hauling capability that you always have with you, but it is admittedly a tough choice.
 

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Do you require the extra seating of an SUV?

The narrow rear door opening would probably bother me a bit. We have only owned our Ridgeline for a few months now, yes, the rear door opening is a little on the narrow side, it is what it is so it will either work for you or it will not. I am a bigger guy and I have no issues with entering or egressing the rear door. We do carry a kennel in the rear area which requires some finagling getting in and out, where we have tried removing the attaching bolt of the door checker to allow the door to open wider, but IOP this has not change the situation significantly? The replacement door checkers we have purchased will remain in a drawer, for now.

On a related note, what we do like about the Ridgeline is that it is the perfect height for us where sliding in and out is so comfortably easy, be it the front or the back.

It just seems like the Ridgeline would require several concessions on a daily basis for a significant advantage occasionally. Not sure this is rational thinking, just where my head is at right now. The Ridgeline has proven to be almost the perfect vehicle for us, but it appears that you are needing folks to talk you into a Ridgeline, when you have already determined for yourself that it may not really be the vehicle for you? I believe that until you become more confident in purchasing a Ridgeline, another vehicle would probably be more appropriate?

Bill
 

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I have both a 2012 Outback Premium and a 2017 Ridgeline RTL-E. While I love the Outback, and it has been problem free in the 80,000 miles since new, I was getting tired of the lack of power in the 4 cyl. I hauled a lot of stuff in that Outback, including a move 5 hours away loaded with a roof rack and towing a fully loaded open Uhaul trailer. Won't do that agian as it was a severe strain on the Outback. When it got time to sell my wife's '06 Accord, I thought about a 6 cyl Outback, but realized that I really missed the versatility of a truck. So we sold the Accord, kept the '12 Outback for my wife, and bought the '17 Ridgeline (used with 34K and change on the clock). I am really liking the Ridgeline so far - especially the more refined ride and interior - after having driven both the Colorado and the Tacoma. All that said, I have ordered the front door stops to replace the limiting rear door stops. Should be an easy swap.
 

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IMO Passport with the occasional borrow of a trailer would be the best compromise if owning 1 vehcile. If you could keep the Accord get the RL. For me, the RL lacks the fun factor/interstate commuting capability of the Accord, but I need the RL tons more than the Accord V6.
 

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Another thing to keep in mind, correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe all Subarus are cvt now. My mom has a Forrester, the cvt is more than fine for casual driving, but there is an odd delay when stomping on it and letting off after stomping on it while the cvt adjusts.
 

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I have both a 2012 Outback Premium and a 2017 Ridgeline RTL-E.
Interesting. My wife drives a 2016 Outback and I have the 2019 Ridgeline. I used to envy her Subaru until I got the Ridgeline. The Outback is awesome, except towing limits. I am wishing the Ridgeline DID tow 6000. 5000 is not quite enough for the RVs we like best.
 

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Sounds like you could use the RL for you landscaping/construction debris and other hauling needs.
I haven't driven the Passport but from all the reviews I've read the RL will probably drive easily as nice.
I'm in and out of the back seat area all the time and with the extended door checkers there's absolutely no problem at all with access.
As far as the bike, here's what I do, no need to take off the front wheel and you can either put it in the back seat area or use a locking cable in the bed if you need to stop off anywhere while hauling it around.
395863
 

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Another thing to keep in mind, correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe all Subarus are cvt now. My mom has a Forrester, the cvt is more than fine for casual driving, but there is an odd delay when stomping on it and letting off after stomping on it while the cvt adjusts.
You are correct. Subies are all CVT now.
 

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Not sure where you live, but here is a different question for you: Why not trade the Accord in for two used vehicles? A Chevy/Ford/GMC for your hauling and towing duties, and another for your day to day. Where you live would dictate your insurance exposure.

Regardless, using a cross over for your 'heavy lifting' would easily ruin it. If you are doing a lot of towing, then the Ridgeline may not be the vehicle for you, as it has its limits. I had an opportunity to tow using my G1 and also a '16 Colorado and I enjoyed the experience with the Colorado, than with my Ridgeline. However, I towed more often with the Ridgeline, than the Colorado.

When I turned in my '16 Civic, it was bitter sweet for me. I have, for two years, gotten used to how I became fond of it. It did the job just fine. Last August, I had to get a family vehicle to carry my elderly parents, my toddler, my niece and my sis+bro-in-law and the obvious choice was an Odyssey. i still have my G1, but honestly the only reason I have it (aside from my emotional attachment) is because of its value. Though it is my commuter vehicle, it is almost a sin to just drive it by myself 99% of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not sure where you live, but here is a different question for you: Why not trade the Accord in for two used vehicles? A Chevy/Ford/GMC for your hauling and towing duties, and another for your day to day. Where you live would dictate your insurance exposure.
I think I’d rather get a new daily driver than can handle most cargo and passenger tasks, then in a few years buy a fun car like and S200, Miata, Civic Si, etc. That's my current thinking anyway.
 

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My brother in law just went through the same predicament. Really wanted an F-150 but got an Expedition instead. Was shocked to see it over the weekend during a visit at the lake. In the end the passenger/covered cargo room (can haul 12 foot boards) was a higher priority than having a bed that could easily handle dirty items.
 

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Interesting. My wife drives a 2016 Outback and I have the 2019 Ridgeline. I used to envy her Subaru until I got the Ridgeline. The Outback is awesome, except towing limits. I am wishing the Ridgeline DID tow 6000. 5000 is not quite enough for the RVs we like best.
Same here. Currently have both the 2016 outback and 2019 RL.

Been happy with the outback, but will end up trading that for the new 2020s when they come out


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Why do people trade vehicles they are happy with?
While I am happy with it, it doesn’t mean it’s perfect!

The 3.6 is a hog on gas compared to today’s standards; so the 2020 XT will have the turbo with better fuel economy.. The new infotainment looks cool too.



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