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Discussion Starter #1
Wanting to install a fire extinguisher and bracket somewhere on the RL and wondering if anyone has found an innovative/smart location and mounting style for the second gen RL. I figure the trunk is probably a good place or maybe under one of the front seats. Just don’t want it limiting a lot of trunk space or under rear seat space. I’d also rather not drill holes into the truck in any way.
 

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I had made trunk dividers using Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF), and mounted my extinguisher to one of them. I haven't seen the OEM dividers but I think the material is too thin maybe.

See post #20

398470
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I had made trunk dividers using Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF), and mounted my extinguisher to one of them. I haven't seen the OEM dividers but I think the material is too thin maybe.

See post #20

View attachment 398470
I really like that idea. MDF is cheap and I can remove it any time I need the full length of the trunk! Also no drilling into any truck parts. This is probably the best option and I like it!
 

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Just some friendly advice from a retired firefighter of over 25 years... Do not buy one of the little dinky 2/2.5# extinguishers, the dry-chem and especially not the little halotron ones. They are very poorly rated in usefulness, even in the hands of an experienced firefighter.

For vehicles I would suggest a 10# or larger dry-chem, one with an all metal valve set. Stay away from the box-store units like "Kiddie" and "First Alert", stick with proper commercial brands like Amerex. Another reason is that 10# and up commercial units have proper/tested vehicle mounts available. The last thing you want in a wreck is several pounds of steel flying around the interior after it breaks free of the cheesy mount, I've worked calls where people were struck in the head by them and severely injured.
 

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The post above prompted my response.

Like they say "it is not the size of the sword (extinguisher in this case) but the swordsman". An experienced person can put out a fire with a 10BC rated extinguisher that an inexperienced person can't put out with a 40BC rated extinguisher.

Any "listed" extinguisher is appropriate for its rating regardless of the material that it is made from. Generally, the plastic body/valve ones are not serviceable (ie, single-use). The classification of extinguishers by weight of the agent has been replaced by the alphanumeric classification about 25 years ago when I was a career firefighter-medic working out of a fire prevention bureau. I don't think that rating scheme has changed.

Halotron is the replacement for halon which has been banned from production for several years. The halotron version of extinguisher is appropriate for high-value property like electronics and computers and our Ridgelines.

If you carry an extinguisher in your vehicle be aware that the constant vibration can pack the extinguishing agent and cause the extinguisher to discharge without releasing the agent when needed most. A fire extinguisher in a vehicle is not a set and forget item and needs to be rated for the type of fire you may encounter.

If you are going to carry an extinguisher then get some training, otherwise, it is false security. Refer to NFPA 10 for specific details.

Personally, if my Ridgeline catches on fire, I hope it burns to the ground and doesn't cause any other damage. That's why I am insured. Off-road vehicles should always carry an appropriate fire extinguisher to prevent collateral damage such as a wildfire.
 

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Personally, if my Ridgeline catches on fire, I hope it burns to the ground and doesn't cause any other damage. That's why I am insured.
This.

And I'm not gonna try to save another person's car … just ensure people are away and call 911.
 
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The post above prompted my response.

Like they say "it is not the size of the sword (extinguisher in this case) but the swordsman". An experienced person can put out a fire with a 10BC rated extinguisher that an inexperienced person can't put out with a 40BC rated extinguisher.

Any "listed" extinguisher is appropriate for its rating regardless of the material that it is made from. Generally, the plastic body/valve ones are not serviceable (ie, single-use). The classification of extinguishers by weight of the agent has been replaced by the alphanumeric classification about 25 years ago when I was a career firefighter-medic working out of a fire prevention bureau. I don't think that rating scheme has changed.

Halotron is the replacement for halon which has been banned from production for several years. The halotron version of extinguisher is appropriate for high-value property like electronics and computers and our Ridgelines.

If you carry an extinguisher in your vehicle be aware that the constant vibration can pack the extinguishing agent and cause the extinguisher to discharge without releasing the agent when needed most. A fire extinguisher in a vehicle is not a set and forget item and needs to be rated for the type of fire you may encounter.

If you are going to carry an extinguisher then get some training, otherwise, it is false security. Refer to NFPA 10 for specific details.

Personally, if my Ridgeline catches on fire, I hope it burns to the ground and doesn't cause any other damage. That's why I am insured. Off-road vehicles should always carry an appropriate fire extinguisher to prevent collateral damage such as a wildfire.
I agree with most of this up until the point of watching my truck burn to the ground depending on how bad things have gotten, even though I am also fully insured. I have a decent amount of extinguisher training as a member of flight crew on C-130s I am very fond of extensive extinguisher checks before every flight during a preflight inspection. Our aircraft do still run extinguishers that are charged with Halon 1211/Halon 1201. It is my duty to ensure they are all in proper working order and to utilize them in the case of emergency in flight. Halon gas is quite dangerous and you must consider depressurization of the cabin and or donning O2 masks. Extinguishers are also good insurance for cargo and or campers/trailers. I have personally witnessed a number of accounts of hot brakes and once watched a tire violently explode and burn up the entire side of a cattle trailer. All good reasons to spend less than $100 and have a good way of preventing a lot of damage and potentially injury.

edit: changed “toxic” to “dangerous”
 

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Our aircraft do still run extinguishers that are charged with Halon 1211/Halon 1201. It is my duty to ensure they are all in proper working order and to utilize them in the case of emergency in flight. Halon gas is quite toxic and you must consider depressurization of the cabin and or donning O2 masks.
While attending the National Fire Academy about four decades ago, I was told that the military had been buying up any Halon that comes available since it is no longer manufactured since it is a chlorofluorocarbon (aka: CFC). Halon is desirable as an extinguishing agent because of its low toxicity, effective properties at low concentrations and leaving no residue. I long time personal friend of mine is retired as the Yale University librarian and he said that their critical documents are protected by a Halon system. Just for the record, Halon is relatively nontoxic to humans but it can be an asphyxiant when discharged in an enclosed space.
 

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I carry an "Element" fire extinguisher not in my Ridgeline, but in my vintage cars. ( https://elementfire.com/ ) It weighs practically nothing and can be mounted easily within reach. The photo below shows it in my 1963 Rampside pickup, with a conventional extinguisher sitting nearby for size comparison.
No offense but those are pretty much a joke

We were provided several cases of them for demo back when they were first marketing, they wanted us to try them and review. We played with them and after just a few minutes it became clear they were limited to useless most of the time and in most situations. The videos they market with are limited to very specific staged scenarios that are meant to sell to the naive. You have to get exceptionally close and "flood" the area, and even a tiny breeze makes them 100% useless.

Seriously, they are a joke.
Ditch them and get a few ten-pounders
 

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This.

And I'm not gonna try to save another person's car … just ensure people are away and call 911.
I always recommend to any layperson NOT to fight a vehicle fire under any circumstance except...
-When life is at stake (always)
-When containing the fire may save a structure (situational/safety dependent)
-When containing the fire may prevent a wild-land fire (situational/safety dependent)
Otherwise, just let it burn, that's what insurance is for

Over the past half century I've used extinguishers on a number of occasions where trapped people and pets were at risk. Here in NM there are many places where a first in engine can be an hour or more away, even on paved highways. I could care less about the vehicle, but having been firsthand witness to several events where people burned to death, where a proper fire extinguisher could have saved them... well, you get the idea.
 

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While attending the National Fire Academy about four decades ago, I was told that the military had been buying up any Halon that comes available since it is no longer manufactured since it is a chlorofluorocarbon (aka: CFC). Halon is desirable as an extinguishing agent because of its low toxicity, effective properties at low concentrations and leaving no residue. I long time personal friend of mine is retired as the Yale University librarian and he said that their critical documents are protected by a Halon system. Just for the record, Halon is relatively nontoxic to humans but it can be an asphyxiant when discharged in an enclosed space.
Thats about my time frame in the military. We had just moved into a new building that had the Halon system installed. Group of people were having a barbecue out back and the flames got out of control and caught a picnic table on fire. A young lady ran into the building and pulled the fire alarm. The sirens go off, lights flashing, all of the doors automatically closed, after 1 minute the Halon system discharged. The CO was very pissed. Cost $25k to recharge the system.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
While attending the National Fire Academy about four decades ago, I was told that the military had been buying up any Halon that comes available since it is no longer manufactured since it is a chlorofluorocarbon (aka: CFC). Halon is desirable as an extinguishing agent because of its low toxicity, effective properties at low concentrations and leaving no residue. I long time personal friend of mine is retired as the Yale University librarian and he said that their critical documents are protected by a Halon system. Just for the record, Halon is relatively nontoxic to humans but it can be an asphyxiant when discharged in an enclosed space.
Right, that’s more the danger of using it aboard the aircraft, I suppose “toxic” isn’t the right word. It makes you incapacitated but not dead.
 

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Ill let her burn but have several in the house by each door and in all rooms. Type A,Size ll, Type BC,(ABC) 5 to 10 lb. with the hose, they are every where if needed to get out, not to mention an emergency window ladder. Beware lucky if you get a minute out of the 5lb er.
 

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Ill let her burn but have several in the house by each door and in all rooms. Type A,Size ll, Type BC,(ABC) 5 to 10 lb. with the hose, they are every where if needed to get out, not to mention an emergency window ladder. Beware lucky if you get a minute out of the 5lb er.
A typical 5# drychem fully discharges in about 15 seconds, a 10# about 20sec, and a 20# about 30sec
A 2.5 gallon water extinguisher has a discharge time of about 55 sec and a range of almost 50 ft

ABC's are fine for home and garage, but I would also suggest at least one 2.5 water extinguisher per floor
Most combustibles in a home are class A, so water is almost always the best agent

People are often shocked by how effective a can is in a typical residential fire. Decades ago we always had a "can man", but downsizing has impacted how fires are fought by many departments, and using cans became sort of looked down upon. Today there has thankfully been a resurgence as many departments are rediscovering how well they work, and they are changing tactics back to some old school methods using a can.

Im not saying a layperson should be attacking fires like this, but... even in unskilled hands they can really be effective and buy the time needed to get kids and pets out. Even if you don't get the fire extinguished, you can really slow a fires progression until engines arrive.

Room fire vs can #1

Room fire vs can #2
 

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If you carry an extinguisher in your vehicle be aware that the constant vibration can pack the extinguishing agent and cause the extinguisher to discharge without releasing the agent when needed most. A fire extinguisher in a vehicle is not a set and forget item and needs to be rated for the type of fire you may encounter.
I often see the same, dry chemical extinguishers in buses, trucks, and tractors that I see hanging around inside buildings - the difference being those used in mobile applications are strapped in place instead of hanging from a bracket.
 

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I agree with most of this up until the point of watching my truck burn to the ground depending on how bad things have gotten, even though I am also fully insured. I have a decent amount of extinguisher training as a member of flight crew on C-130s I am very fond of extensive extinguisher checks before every flight during a preflight inspection. Our aircraft do still run extinguishers that are charged with Halon 1211/Halon 1201. It is my duty to ensure they are all in proper working order and to utilize them in the case of emergency in flight. Halon gas is quite dangerous and you must consider depressurization of the cabin and or donning O2 masks. Extinguishers are also good insurance for cargo and or campers/trailers. I have personally witnessed a number of accounts of hot brakes and once watched a tire violently explode and burn up the entire side of a cattle trailer. All good reasons to spend less than $100 and have a good way of preventing a lot of damage and potentially injury.

edit: changed “toxic” to “dangerous”
Never been a fan of repaired damaged vehicles... "Let it burn, protect the surrounding" is the best suggestion I have ever heard regarding fires... Living in California, it seems to me, that's what Fire Professionals do all the time... Contain it, and let it burn itself out
 
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