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So I was returning my title and insurance card into my glove box when this guy fell out as I closed the box. It came from behind the box. I've no idea what it is and have not been able to identify it. Could I get a hand to name the piece and instruction (or a link to another thread/site) on how to return it to its proper place? Thanks!


(I'm uploading from an iPhone. Hopefully the photo loads with it)
 

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It is a piston that fits in a cylinder on the right side of the glove box. It acts like a damper so the glove box drops slowly.

You need to pop out the stops on either side of the glove box from inside the box, so it will lower all the way down. Put the piston back inside the swiveling cylinder behind the glove box (right hand side) and bring the other end to the top of the opening of the glove box.
Hold it there while you raise the glove box back up, and the indentation at the end of the rod should be facing down, and snap over the screw on the right side near the top of the glove box. You may have to loosen the screw to get it secure, then tighten again (not too tight) The rod should be holding on. DO NOT let the glove box go, or the piston will come out again.
Now push the glove box further in, replacing the 2 stops from the sides of the glove box that you had removed. Make sure they fully snap in place. Now, you can let go.
 

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Related to the famous novel, "Clean or replace your own cabin filter, improve air flow & save a bundle"

 

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It is a piston that fits in a cylinder on the right side of the glove box. It acts like a damper so the glove box drops slowly.

You need to pop out the stops on either side of the glove box from inside the box, so it will lower all the way down. Put the piston back inside the swiveling cylinder behind the glove box (right hand side) and bring the other end to the top of the opening of the glove box.
Hold it there while you raise the glove box back up, and the indentation at the end of the rod should be facing down, and snap over the screw on the right side near the top of the glove box. You may have to loosen the screw to get it secure, then tighten again (not too tight) The rod should be holding on. DO NOT let the glove box go, or the piston will come out again.
Now push the glove box further in, replacing the 2 stops from the sides of the glove box that you had removed. Make sure they fully snap in place. Now, you can let go.
Excellent DIY job description. I just want to add. I don't use a screw driver to pop out the stops, I just pitch (hands only)the stops from the glove box outside using a cloth (more comfort). I don't take the risk of scratch the glove box or break any plastic. All the videos that I see of DIYs replacing Air cabin filter they never put the piston back. I don't know what they are trying to prove. May be trying to show how fast they are.
 

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I don't use a screwdriver for the stops either. You can position them must easier by hand, then snap them in (or out).
When I replace the cabin filter I sit close enough to the glove box so it hits my knees and does not drop all the way down and pull the piston out before I can disconnect the other end from the screw.
 

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It's part of the flux capacitor. Better put it back in, otherwise you'll never be able to get back to the future...!

:act024:
 

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LOL! Exactly! I go nowhere without my glove box damper engaged.
 

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As I have low mileage I've only replaced the cabin air filter once, but as I recall this piston initially was a PITA to replace. I don't even recall why, but eventually I (a simple Simon) was able to resolve the issue.

No biggie, just view a few Ridgeline cabin air filter replacement videos and then tackle the job. Or pay Honda $90 to take care of it.

Don't forget to report how it resolved.
 

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It's part of the flux capacitor. Better put it back in, otherwise you'll never be able to get back to the future...!

:act024:
LOL...! But really that thing can be a pain in the ass to get back in.
 
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