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I have a 2017 Ridgeline with 50000 miles. Starting to get the VCM noise. Does anyone know if this same problem exists in the 2018 or 2019?
 

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What exactly is VCM noise?
 

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The VCM in the G2 is hardly noticeable. The only way I can hear it is if I turn the radio and A/C off and listen closely. Compared to my 2011 Odyssey I don't know its even there. You can feel the whole van shake when it engages. It was so bad that we put a muzzler on it.
 

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What exactly is VCM noise?
Variable Cylinder Management (VCM) is Honda's term for its variable displacement technology, which saves fuel by using the i-VTEC system to disable one bank of cylinders during specific driving conditions—for example, highway driving. The 2008–12 Accords took this a step further, allowing the engine to go from 6 cylinders, down to 4, and further down to 3 as the computer sees fit.
Unlike the pushrod systems used by DaimlerChrysler's Multi-Displacement System and General Motors' Active Fuel Management, Honda's VCM uses overhead cams. A solenoid unlocks the cam followers on one bank from their respective rockers, so the cam follower floats freely while the valve springs keep the valves closed. The engine's drive by wire throttle allows the engine management computer to smooth out the engine's power delivery, making the system nearly imperceptible on some vehicles. When the VCM system disables cylinders, an "ECO" indicator lights on the dashboard, Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) pumps an opposite-phase sound through the audio speakers to reduce cabin noise, and Active Control Engine Mount (ACM) systems reduce vibration.
Owners of vehicles equipped with VCM frequently face vibration problems due to engine motor mount malfunction while ECO mode is enabled.[1] Instead of replacing motor mounts, owners often override the VCM with a bypass mechanism, such as an in-line resistor based temperature override module. This has the effect of the vehicle computer believing that a sufficient engine temperature to enable VCM has not been reached. While this cannot guarantee that VCM will be disabled (eg. differing climates/load scenarios), it can generally keep VCM from engaging under normal driving conditions.
 

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Variable Cylinder Management (VCM) is Honda's term for its variable displacement technology, which saves fuel by using the i-VTEC system to disable one bank of cylinders during specific driving conditions—for example, highway driving. The 2008–12 Accords took this a step further, allowing the engine to go from 6 cylinders, down to 4, and further down to 3 as the computer sees fit.
Unlike the pushrod systems used by DaimlerChrysler's Multi-Displacement System and General Motors' Active Fuel Management, Honda's VCM uses overhead cams. A solenoid unlocks the cam followers on one bank from their respective rockers, so the cam follower floats freely while the valve springs keep the valves closed. The engine's drive by wire throttle allows the engine management computer to smooth out the engine's power delivery, making the system nearly imperceptible on some vehicles. When the VCM system disables cylinders, an "ECO" indicator lights on the dashboard, Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) pumps an opposite-phase sound through the audio speakers to reduce cabin noise, and Active Control Engine Mount (ACM) systems reduce vibration.
Owners of vehicles equipped with VCM frequently face vibration problems due to engine motor mount malfunction while ECO mode is enabled.[1] Instead of replacing motor mounts, owners often override the VCM with a bypass mechanism, such as an in-line resistor based temperature override module. This has the effect of the vehicle computer believing that a sufficient engine temperature to enable VCM has not been reached. While this cannot guarantee that VCM will be disabled (eg. differing climates/load scenarios), it can generally keep VCM from engaging under normal driving conditions.

Good reply, but that doesn't really describe the 'noise'.
 

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Variable Cylinder Management (VCM) is Honda's term for its variable displacement technology, which saves fuel by using the i-VTEC system to disable one bank of cylinders during specific driving conditions—for example, highway driving. The 2008–12 Accords took this a step further, allowing the engine to go from 6 cylinders, down to 4, and further down to 3 as the computer sees fit.
Unlike the pushrod systems used by DaimlerChrysler's Multi-Displacement System and General Motors' Active Fuel Management, Honda's VCM uses overhead cams. A solenoid unlocks the cam followers on one bank from their respective rockers, so the cam follower floats freely while the valve springs keep the valves closed. The engine's drive by wire throttle allows the engine management computer to smooth out the engine's power delivery, making the system nearly imperceptible on some vehicles. When the VCM system disables cylinders, an "ECO" indicator lights on the dashboard, Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) pumps an opposite-phase sound through the audio speakers to reduce cabin noise, and Active Control Engine Mount (ACM) systems reduce vibration.
Owners of vehicles equipped with VCM frequently face vibration problems due to engine motor mount malfunction while ECO mode is enabled.[1] Instead of replacing motor mounts, owners often override the VCM with a bypass mechanism, such as an in-line resistor based temperature override module. This has the effect of the vehicle computer believing that a sufficient engine temperature to enable VCM has not been reached. While this cannot guarantee that VCM will be disabled (eg. differing climates/load scenarios), it can generally keep VCM from engaging under normal driving conditions.
Speedlever knows what VCM is.
The OP seems to be suggesting that "VCM noise" is a common if not chronic problem with 2017 Ridgelines yet there really isn't any VCM noise that has been established as chronic issue on this Forum. I think that is the point Speedlever is making.

Plenty of people don't like the idea of the cylinder deactivation and some seem to have a heightened sensitivity and or genuine issues with vibrations that may be as a result of the VCM system including the active motor mounts. Still its not an established common issue nor is there some sort of well known "VCM noise"
 

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@ecobler , are you sure it is not your active motor mount causing an issue? Have you checked with the '15+ TLX community or the G5 Odyssey community? Just a caution; the folks over at the OdyClub complained about the VCM in the G4 and they are now 'complaining' about it in their G5, so use an open mind and be neutral when you read their 'experiences'.

@Kevin56 , you may want to cite your 'copy and paste' source as to not plagiarize yourself . Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_Cylinder_Management
 

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I've been straining to "hear" something I could attribute to VCM for three years.
Can't.
 

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Are you sure the Ridgeline has VCM? I thought I read everything about the vehicle before buying my 2018 and I never read or heard anything about VCM, and I haven't noticed any indication that any cylinders ever deactivate, and I do mostly highway driveway, with some of it flat. Unless maybe they just deactivate going downhill.
 

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Are you sure the Ridgeline has VCM? I thought I read everything about the vehicle before buying my 2018 and I never read or heard anything about VCM, and I haven't noticed any indication that any cylinders ever deactivate, and I do mostly highway driveway, with some of it flat. Unless maybe they just deactivate going downhill.
VCM is standard on all Honda products with the V6 sense at least 2016. There are no visual indicators of when the system is active.
 

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From what I understand, the VCM engages the transmission torque converter. A loud thunk often, but not always, occurs when VCM activates/deactivates. Sometimes it is bad enough that I can feel the RL slow slightly. Dealer, of course, says normal. That and the brakes have been a big disappointment but the rest of the vehicle's attributes are great.
 

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I haven't heard the thunk. I agree on the brakes--I guess the stopping distance isn't bad but I don't like the pedal going down to 1" from the floor. The one time I had an emergency stop situation I felt like it was hard to reach that far down with my foot. And I'm not confident the parking brake holds well on a hill either, but the dealer tells me they are both OK.
 

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I haven't heard the thunk. I agree on the brakes--I guess the stopping distance isn't bad but I don't like the pedal going down to 1" from the floor. The one time I had an emergency stop situation I felt like it was hard to reach that far down with my foot. And I'm not confident the parking brake holds well on a hill either, but the dealer tells me they are both OK.
The Dodge Charger Hellcat with it's super crazy OEM brakes had similar feel with the 'dead zone' when running up Pikes peak.

I think it's some weird design that we are finding awful.
 

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I haven't heard the thunk. I agree on the brakes--I guess the stopping distance isn't bad but I don't like the pedal going down to 1" from the floor. The one time I had an emergency stop situation I felt like it was hard to reach that far down with my foot. And I'm not confident the parking brake holds well on a hill either, but the dealer tells me they are both OK.
We have not had any issues with the brakes themselves, the biggest "concern" we have with the Ridgeline concerning brakes is that we cannot hold the transmission in first gear, where coming down steeper, twisty hills, especially with a trailer behind us, we are too uncomfortably dependent on just the brakes. (Though they have become warm enough to smell them, they have yet to fail doing their job, however.)

Bill
 
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