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Discussion Starter #1
With regards to installing the VCMuzzler on the new 2017 Ridgeline, I think an installation video or pics clearly illustrating each step of the process including the removal and reinstallation of the tricky engine cover with its infamous grommets would be extremely helpful. Personally, im a little hesitant as im concerned ill break an engine cover tab or lose a grommet into the engine bay. Can someone who's done this successfully before please provide a video or pics that clearly shows the proper technique for comlete Muzzler installation? Thanks in advance to those who step up.
Dave
 

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2017 Ridgeline RTL-E, Northeast U.S.
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I just installed the VCMuzzler. It took me almost 15 mins to get the Honda cover back on the manifold. It took about five minutes to do the actual installation. I took pictures the whole way, but to be honest, I don't think they're going to be that helpful. There are so many parts jammed together that it can be very difficult to know what you're looking at. To do it right I think I need to crop very closely and also show wide shots (which I took) and then annotate with a virtual red marker, circling where things are. The truth is, this is a very easy installation. The only instructions anyone needs are the ones that come in the packet with the product. The one thing I learned today is that if you take the cover off slowly and gently, one prong at a time, you don't lose the rubber fittings that grip the prongs. It's also possible to lose the rubber pieces when you're putting the cover back on and I eventually adopted the same gentle, one at a time approach for putting the cover back on.

My method for the cover replacement process is to visually mark points at all four corners (I even took close-ups of these) and try to find a starting point where you're pretty sure all four prongs are resting on the rubber grommets if not in them. The cover descends about 3 inches lower when this is not the case. Then once they're all floating on those rubber pieces I move the cover slightly quarter of an inch in the direction that I think might help locate the holes. That's the approach that finally worked for me. My instinct told me to move the cover a quarter of an inch to the left and when I did they all plopped right in. I softly tapped each of the four to make sure they were in.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: VCMuzzler Installation: Sensor Removal Problem

I'm in the middle of the installation now. Got the cover off no problem with no grommets lost so far.

I'm now trying to remove the sensor cable from the ECT1 connector. It's a tight fit to get either of my hands in there. The release tab is facing the block so that makes it more difficult too. Can the connector be rotated so that the release tab is in a better position so that I can depress it and remove it?

Any help would be appreciated.

Dave
 

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I just used a needle nose plyers, just make sure one side of the plyers is pushing in the tab and dont squeeze too hard or pull on wires, it doesn't take much at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just finished successfully installing the VCMuzzler without losing any rubber grommets. I must say that removing the stock sensor lead was a bit of a [email protected]$%^ but I carefully depressed the release tab with an angled flat screen driver and used two fingers on my other hand to gently lift upward.

I live in New York. Anyone in this general area using the stock blue resistor? I'm looking to find out if the blue is sufficient or has anyone needed to go to the red resistor.

Any data??
 

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i will try the red one today after work and report back if it causes any error codes, i don't have any equipment for checking temps or codes so that's the best i can do.
 

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The ridgeline is similar to this only its more cramped and you have to remove the plastic cover.
 

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2017 Ridgeline RTL-E, Northeast U.S.
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I forgot to mention this morning that I wound up using the blue resistor too. The problem with this is: there's no way to test for improvement that's objective. Subjectively the engine seemed a tad smoother to me this morning after I did the installation. But that's no way to evaluate something like this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re: VCMuzzler Tested. The Results

I installed the Muzzler on my 2017 Ridgeline this morning (cold engine). Then took it to get groceries which involves a short side street drive to a 10 minute highway drive each way. I installed the blue resistor. Ambient outside temp was 88-90 degrees. I live on Long Island, NY. I used my obd II scanner to accurately measure temperature.

Results: Initially, the temp idling in the drive way was below the 167 degree cut off. As I drove on side streets to the highway, temp increased slowly and approached 167. Just prior to highway, temp surpassed the 167 mark. On highway, temp fluctuated from 169-177.8 degrees. The same was true on the return trip. The vast majority of this trip registered temps above the 167 degrees which seemed to indicate that the stock blue resistor was NOT enough to keep vcm from activating.

Contacted the VCMuzzler maker and was instructed to indeed switch to the red resistor in the morning when the engine is definitely cold again.

Hopefully, this will be sufficient to keep reading below 167 and prevent VCM without causing any error codes.
 

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This post is truly helpful, Zorkuser. I haven't looked today, but we're facing a bunch of over 90° days the last time I looked. I'm without an OBDII tester, so any future posts you make along the same lines over the next several days will be like gold to me. Thanks!
 

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I don't know how much use there going to be but here are some pictures that I took this morning. I think the videos that others have taken are actually much more beneficial to break them up into some separate posts so I can do some basic notes.

Pic 1: the cover that greets you when you open the hood of your truck.

Pic 2: what that cover looks like underneath, including the famous "rubber grommets" intact and in the right places.

Pic 3: under the cover, the manifold.
 

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Pic 4: somewhat dim view of the ECT terminal. Note manifold to the left and throttle body to the upper right.

Below, can anybody tell me what this part is that looks broken on my truck? It looks important.

Pic 5: a much better view of the ECT sensor and the cable currently connecting to it. This is taken from the driver side of the truck.

Pic 6: a close-up of the part that appears to be broken. I think it's supposed to seal up in the cover, but the cover seems to be broken and also coming away where it's mounted below as if a blow had struck it.

I fear this object is the ECU, and maybe this happened while they were updating firmware in a New Jersey or wherever holding area.
 

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Pics 7, 8, 9, 10: the four corners of the cover when it's properly installed, photos I took to help me orient the cover in the future.

Pic 11: something you might not have known your Ridgeline can do. There are two different locations in the hood for the hood prop. This one opens the hood just about as far as it can go and is great for working on the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Re: VCMuzzler Red Resistor Data

Hi. For the sake of continuity, here's the relevant data for comparative purposes.

- 2017 Honda Ridgeline
- New York
- Engine condition at time of VCMuzzler II install: cold
- Engine condition at time of resistor change from blue to red: cold

Yesterday (Thursday 7/22/16), I installed the VCMuzzler with the blue resistor. My previous post describes my findings but suffice it to say, for the vast majority of my test drive, the coolant temp was definitely above the 167 degree VCM cutoff temp.

Today (Friday 7/23/16), I changed the blue resistor to the red one as instructed. I won't have highway data until later on today at the earliest but here's what I have so far. Vehicle started up with the red resistor with NO problems or cel warnings. Backed the vehicle into the driveway and let it idle for a while. Engine coolant temps slowly increased as expected and hovered around 159 degrees. I then turned on the a/c while continuing to let it idle. From there I took it for a once around the block. Engine coolant temps topped out at 161.6 degrees. Ambient outside air temp was around 80 degrees (summer morning). My assumption was that the engine coolant temps would have been lower but they were still below the 167 degree cutoff. Obviously, I'm curious about highway data which will be forthcoming.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Re: VCMuzzler: New Data

Ok. As previously posted, installed the blue resistor as my ect was generally above 167 degrees with the red resistor. After installing the blue resistor, I used my OBDlink MX to monitor ect. As a side note, the OBD caused multiple system errors on my driver's side dash again after leaving it in the vehicle and several shutdowns and restarts. Apparently, the Ridgeline does NOT like an OBD device to be left in the vehicle full time.

In any event here are the results with the blue resistor:

- Outside ambient temp 90 degrees
- 95% of mixed driving saw temps in the 163-167 degree range.
- 5% of the time, temps increased above 167 degrees and topped out at 174.2

If I understood the guy who makes the VCMuzzler correctly, this can be seen as acceptable as some people feel that VCM activation on occasion is good as it keeps affected parts engaged and moving from time to time. In the case of the blue resistor, it appears that VCM is held at bay 95% of the time. If I were to increase the resistor to the white one, I could try for temps below 167 degrees 100% of the time but the risk of triggering a CEL would definitely increase as well. I think for the time being, I'll leave the blue one in. When outside temps are not as hot, I'd imagine I'd rarely go over the 167 degrees if ever.

Any thoughts or suggestions are welcome.

Dave
 

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What about the red resistor? Your previous message from this morning said that you put it in. I'm curious why you took it out?

As I said I would do last night, I put the red resistor in this morning. But I haven't had any chance to do any driving at all today. I thought about driving to my dealership to check out a potential problem I found under the hood, but then I realized I would need to take the VCMuzzler out. Without an OBD2 scanner until early next week, I'm sort of driving blind. You're making me wonder whether I should put the blue resistor in too. I don't want to show up to the dealership on Monday with a CEL I can't clear.
 

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Re: VCMuzzler: New Data

... As a side note, the OBD caused multiple system errors on my driver's side dash again after leaving it in the vehicle and several shutdowns and restarts. Apparently, the Ridgeline does NOT like an OBD device to be left in the vehicle full time ...
Dave, would you please specify the TYPE (cable, bluetooth, wi-fi) and BRAND/MODEL of your OBD-II device?

Has anyone else experienced this?
 

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I run the sister adapter to the MX on my RL 24/7. OBDLink LX. Works fine with my 2008 RL.
 
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