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There's an article over on jalopnik right now that includes a video comparing summer vs all-season vs all-weather vs snow vs extreme snow vs studded snow. All tires are Nokian.


No real surprises except that the newest Nokian snow tire bests their dated all-weather tire all around, which shows that the latest tire tech can trump older tire designations.
 

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There's an article over on jalopnik right now that includes a video comparing summer vs all-season vs all-weather vs snow vs extreme snow vs studded snow. All tires are Nokian.


No real surprises except that the newest Nokian snow tire bests their dated all-weather tire all around, which shows that the latest tire tech can trump older tire designations.
My spousal unit has mountain rated winter tires on her Subaru Outback. I had studded winter tires on my 4WD Tacoma. Neither of us ever got stuck, but I was amazed at where we could go with the Subaru. Got rid of the Tacoma to buy the 2019 Ridgeline. Putting non-studded mountain rated all the way around and hoping for lots of snow.
 

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Just wondering if anyone has experience with all-weather tires (not all-season) on a gen-2. I have a 2019 Touring AWD on stock tires. In snow belt in Ontario, but being retired I don’t venture out if roads are really bad. It would be nice to have a single set of tires and rims, and some of the new options are getting pretty good reviews. Would like to hear your experiences. Thanks, Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just wondering if anyone has experience with all-weather tires (not all-season) on a gen-2. I have a 2019 Touring AWD on stock tires. In snow belt in Ontario, but being retired I don’t venture out if roads are really bad. It would be nice to have a single set of tires and rims, and some of the new options are getting pretty good reviews. Would like to hear your experiences. Thanks, Mike
I can't speak from experience, but based on general tire knowledge and the video linked above, one might assume that the latest "all-weather" tires may have all of the advantages of all-season tires and winter tires from, say, 10-15 years ago. That's not a bad thing.


Another way to put it:

For winter driving...modern winter tires > modern all-weather tires > all-season tires,

For other three seasons...modern all-season tires > modern all-weather tires > winter tires,

For year-round driving...modern all-weather tires >= all-season and winter tires from 10-15 years ago.

In a nutshell, i don't think you'll have any problem with good all-weather tires on an AWD vehicle year-round.
 

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No comparison for steering and stopping between real snow tires and what comes on these vehicles. I would put a 2WD drive vehicle with 4 Blizzak type tires up against the RL AWD (or any other 4WD / AWD anyday for steering and stopping. .....which are more valuable and needed more of the time than plowing through deep snow
 

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If you have a choice of when to be out in the snow and if you have decent snow removal I would think that with a RL you would be fine with the snowflake rated all seasons. Then again you are in Canada. Up until now I always had to be out chauffeuring my daughters to school and always had snows. I had to get rid of an Odyssey because it couldn't pull off on steep hills even with Blizzaks. From that point on it was AWD and snows, difficult to go back even though I don't have to be out in the snow anymore.

One thing that amazed me from the charts on the Tire Rack was wet braking performance with snows. Generally, it's poor. Point is that I thought thought it would be the same as an all season. Overall though snow braking is where a snow tire excels we will always need one car in the stable that will have snows.
 

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Just wondering if anyone has experience with all-weather tires (not all-season) on a gen-2. I have a 2019 Touring AWD on stock tires. In snow belt in Ontario, but being retired I don’t venture out if roads are really bad. It would be nice to have a single set of tires and rims, and some of the new options are getting pretty good reviews. Would like to hear your experiences. Thanks, Mike
I put a set of all weather Toyo Celsius CUV tires on my 2018 Sienna last year. I live in north central PA so we get snow. The van did ok last winter with them. I’m putting a set of Verdestein Quatrac 5 tires on my daughter’s 2019 Forester for this winter. I just got sick and tired of the annual swap to a set of dedicated winter tires every year. If the snow is too bad for these all weathers I’ll just stay at home.
Given that, I haven’t decided what to do about my new Ridgeline Sport. I’m leaning to just leaving the stock Firestones on. Consumer Report says their not too bad in snow.
 

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I had the Nokians WR3 on my CX5 and they were amazing in the snow! Another guy on the form tried the WR4 and loves them in the snow. I am sticking with Nokians for my Ridgeline but I am trying to decide between the WR4 and the Rotiivas. I would like to try the Rotiivas because they are an AT tire (I drive off road a ton), but I am not sure if they will rub. The lowest size they offer is 265/ 60 /18 (which should fit with my 2inch lift, yet...). Has any one tried these yet?
 

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We're in the middle of an all-day snow event here is southern Michigan and my area will probably end up with about 7". I made a run to the store and gas station this morning about 7:30 with the stock FIrestones and almost any braking caused the ABS to start pulsing. Braking on a downhill stretch and trying to make a left turn was dicey at best. No real problem returning and climbing the hill. I had snow mode engaged.

Next stop was loading the bed with the 4 Michelin Latitude X-Ice winter tires and 17" wheels setup I bought from JimV last Friday and heading to Discount Tire where they bolted them on for free. On the way home, braking was free of any ABS pulse and heavy snow and slush on an overpass was a non-event. I've been using using Michelin X-Ice winter tires for a number of years and have been very pleased with their traction.
 

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Just tired of the annual winter tire swap. After reading some negative reviews this week about the stock firestones winter performance, specifically their tendency to get rock hard in very low temps, I ordered a set of Kumho Crugen HT51 all season tires with the mountain snowflake symbol. Not dedicated snow tires but I’ll chance it. I read some pretty positive reviews of their snow performance.
We’ll see how it goes.
 

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I bought a set of Nokian Hakkapeliitta Q tires for a Subaru Legacy sedan years ago. Where I lived then we got freezing rain and some snow all winter. The Qs were an ice-focused winter tire, and they were stunningly good in those conditions. They’re expensive, but if a person has a need for a dedicated winter tire, I definitely recommend Nokians, if they still make anything like the old Hakkapiliittas.
 

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I put a set of all weather Toyo Celsius CUV tires on my 2018 Sienna last year. I live in north central PA so we get snow. The van did ok last winter with them. I’m putting a set of Verdestein Quatrac 5 tires on my daughter’s 2019 Forester for this winter. I just got sick and tired of the annual swap to a set of dedicated winter tires every year. If the snow is too bad for these all weathers I’ll just stay at home.
Given that, I haven’t decided what to do about my new Ridgeline Sport. I’m leaning to just leaving the stock Firestones on. Consumer Report says their not too bad in snow.
I was amazed at the performance of my 2019 RTL-E in the little 4-5 inches of snow that we had here in Georgia last winter. I have a very steep long hill behind my house and the RL went up the hill without any problems. Hardly any wheel slippage and I have the stock Firestones. They are really good tires IMHO.
 

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I'm in the dedicated winter tire camp. I have a set of Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2's mounted on a second set of stock Ridgeline rims (take off's I purchased on eBay) . I put them on around Thanksgiving and take them off just after St. Patrick's Day. I purchased an inexpensive impact wrench at Harbor Freight to make the twice a year transition easier. I'm at just over 75K miles on my 2017 RTL-E and will be needing new all-seasons next spring. I'm leaning towards the Michelin Defender LTX M/S but am open to other considerations.
 

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We live in heavy snow country. I'm a dedicated snow tire guy since the mid 90s. Until you actually run a real snow tire, you have zero frame of reference for comparison. Many here tout the RL AWD's traction capability on stock tires in snow. Traction is important, but steering and stopping are much more important in everyday snow/ice driving. It's also my opinion that tires and clearance have more to do with snow driving the vast majority of the time that the type of AWD/4WD system.

Our G1 RL came with Michelin LTXs. I considered them marginal when new in snow / ice where we live. They steadily became less effective. By the winter of 2012 and 34K miles, our 2010 FWD LaCrosse with 2 year old Blizzaks easily outperformed the AWD RL in most every snow situation...especially steering and stopping. IMO, it was dangerous to have 2 vehicles so vastly different in handling capability. I bought a set of Blizzaks for the 09 RL and it became a formidable snow vehicle.

Being long retired and now leaving for the winter in early January for warmer climates, I've not bought any snow tires the last several years. We are compromised by this, but we're not forced to drive anywhere when conditions are bad

The 17 G2 RL came with Firestone LE2s. They are worse than the LTXs out of the box. Heading into this winter at 24K miles their performance is bad for all 3 winter driving needs: steering, stopping, and traction. If we were here for the winter, there would be a dedicated set of snow tires put on.

Another reason for my post here is that our 17 300S AWD, also with 24K miles, came with all season Michelin Primacy MXM4s for the stock tire. The 300 easily out performs the RL right now in the snow/ice we have. No comparison. Tires are the main reason for that. Certainly a 2 foot storm and clearance would come into play. Advantage RL then for getting around in deeper snow.

I mentioned this a couple years ago when we got the car and my opinion remains the same going into our 3rd winter with both vehicles. I the RL AWD, but prefer the RWD/AWD bias of the 300 over the FWD/AWD of the RL. IMO, it's much more natural for the slight oversteer of the RWD before the aids kicks in to the understeer/push of the FWD/AWD RL. Aging tires exacerbate the understeer condition in the RL causing the aides to kick in much faster. About the only condition I've yet to make a comparison of the two systems in would a slush condition on the highway.
 
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