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Just curious - how many people let their truck "warm up" before putting it in drive? How long do you let it warm up? What is your opinion on warming up a vehicle?
 

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Crank the vehical, and go. Helps engine oil reach operating temp faster and get pressure built up in the system quicker.
 

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YIKES!!! start er up and let her run atleast 30-45 seconds to get the oil out of the pan and through the engine.
 

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I'm usually "late". Warm up would mean I'm "later". Now in the winter, I would allow a few more seconds warm up. Nobody moves fast when it's below zero. Burrrrr :cool:
 

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I go right away and just take it easy till the thermostat is settled out at the normal operating temp. Doesn't take long in the Ridgeline.
 

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The idea of warming up a vehicle for any length of time is one of those pieces of advice that continue to stick around that is no longer relevant. Much in the same way changing your oil every 3,000 miles still lingers on. Today's engines and oils are much different than they were in the past. I agree that in really cold weather, let the engine idle for a little bit. I would say basically enough to turn the car on, put on your seatbelt, check all your mirrors, adjust the climate control settings, adjust the radio and then go. If it is really cold, don't hot rod it until the temp gauge shows the engine is warm. Today's engines are more efficient and come up to the correct temperature more quickly when driven as opposed to just sitting there.

Of course this all depends on your individual situation. When I lived in North Dakota, I would plug in my car overnight to keep the oil warm, so I basically let the car warm up so I would be getting into a warm car and also so my breath wouldn't fog up the windows. Now that I am in Nevada (northern), I pretty much never let the vehicle idle to warm up, even up in the mountains during the winter. If it is really, really cold and you don't have your vehicle plugged in then definitely let it warm up, but in most cases anything over a few seconds to get the oil circulated is a waste of time, gas, wear and tear, and clean air.
 

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Crank, adjust mirrors and environment and put her in gear and go.

When I was in college some 32 years ago, I worked at the EPA labs where they came up with the gas miles numbers during the 1974 gas crisis.

They took 2 fords, 2 chevys, and 2 VW's that were identical and started them put one in drive and took it to 45 mph and after 2 minutes stopped the car and let it sit for 10 minutes. the twin was started idled for 45 seconds and then brought to 45 mph ( on a dynomometer - the lab had 10 of these that worked the others were used to MPG tests ). after 50,000 miles ( and no oil changes ) they engines were broken down and measured for wear. The ones that idled -the engines barely meet epa emissions and were visually worn. the engine that was run cold looked new and easily passed epa emissions. the room was set for 20 degrees for 10,000 miles , 90 for 10,000 miles and the remaining were at normal 72 temperature.

Idling the engine hurts it. Not changing the oil did not help it either.
 

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WOW!!!! Ill admit. you folks are brave............start up is still and always will be the toughest beginning to an engines day. oil will always be in the pan at start up and gravity insists that you wait atleast a few seconds for it to be circulated out of the pan. gravity is still relevant no matter what improvements have been made in oils and engines.
 

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you forget that our filter has anti drain valve so that means not ALL the oil is in the pan. In addition, unless your car has been sitting there for MONTHS, the oil still costs the parts. The oil pressure is up in a FRACTION of a section after the car is started. If it isn't, then you've got other issues.

It has nothing to do with being brave, it just that it's not needed.
 

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I usually start it and Im ready in about 2 minutes aftyer getting the kid loaded up and garage shut and stuff :)
 

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sure, then it has to be pulled out of the filter. :rolleyes: pressure is up immediately but it STILL takes a little time to circulate throughout the lines/engine. thats all im saying..........out of all the posts, for some reason i want to make a point after 5 months on the ROC. :D
 

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DWdrums said:
I usually start it and Im ready in about 2 minutes aftyer getting the kid loaded up and garage shut and stuff :)
dw, thats not a warm up..................thats efficient multitasking! ;)
 

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jeffiam said:
sure, then it has to be pulled out of the filter. :rolleyes: pressure is up immediately but it STILL takes a little time to circulate throughout the lines/engine. thats all im saying..........out of all the posts, for some reason i want to make a point after 5 months on the ROC. :D

and all I am saying is, your engine parts aren't dry just because you've parked your vehical over night.

:)
 

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I'm not sure if we are at IS TO or IS NOT :p I just want to chime in and say that at OUR house its about WARMING UP THE PASSENGERS. My wife and kids want that truck comfortable when they get in :rolleyes: If the truck benifits, Hallelujah! We still get in the 30s at night, remember, " The warmest winter you will ever spend, is a summer in Montana" :eek: :D
 

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Oil isn't the only thing to protect your engine. Pretty much all newer engines (pistons, piston rings, cylinder walls, valves, etc.) have an alloy coating for additional protection to the engine parts that receive the most wear. That is one of the ways the engine manufacturers get an additional 5 hp, cleaner burn, better mpgs, etc.

If you will notice, the oil we use is a 5W20, extremely lightweight oil and very small molecules. Gravity will pull heavier oil and bigger molecules down, but capillary action and static charge (static cling) will allow the lighter weight oil and smaller molecules to remain adhered to the engine parts.

Stick a knife in syrup or cooking oil. Lift the knife out and you will see (taste) that the syrup or cooking oil will stay adhered to the knife. Leave it there for a little while and see what happens. Still there.

Better yet, take your oil dip stick out and leave it our for awhile. Come back later and rub your fingers, or better yet a white cloth, over it. What do you feel or see?
 

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nevadagarth said:
Oil isn't the only thing to protect your engine. Pretty much all newer engines (pistons, piston rings, cylinder walls, valves, etc.) have an alloy coating for additional protection to the engine parts that receive the most wear. That is one of the ways the engine manufacturers get an additional 5 hp, cleaner burn, better mpgs, etc.

If you will notice, the oil we use is a 5W20, extremely lightweight oil and very small molecules. Gravity will pull heavier oil and bigger molecules down, but capillary action and static charge (static cling) will allow the lighter weight oil and smaller molecules to remain adhered to the engine parts.

Stick a knife in syrup or cooking oil. Lift the knife out and you will see (taste) that the syrup or cooking oil will stay adhered to the knife. Leave it there for a little while and see what happens. Still there.

Better yet, take your oil dip stick out and leave it our for awhile. Come back later and rub your fingers, or better yet a white cloth, over it. What do you feel or see?
yes, have no doubts about the parts still having oil on them. thats true today and was true before oil and engine advances. i just personally think its better to let all fluids fully circulate before advancing the engine based on my experiences/inquiries. i once drove my 84 chevy silverado 20 miles with 0 psi, the oil pump had failed. i was fortunate the engine didn't lock up but the type of lube i used allowed me that extra time since it was still coating the engine parts.
 
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