Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought 2 60lb bags of sand that I put in the back of my '97 Nissan during the winter to keep the back from sliding out on the slick, snow covered roads. Has anyone done this for the ridge or is it not necessary? Being a unibody the ridgeline seems more solid and more evenly weighted in the rear than a traditional pick-up. Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
Someone must know the spec weight distribution front/rear of an empty Ridgeline?

I had always done that as well, but that was rear-wheel drive pickups that had little weight in back when empty. Not sure how it would function for a compensating AWD; probably will adjust appropriately in either case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
I would think that with all wheel drive we should be good to go. Just an opinion as in my 4WD pickups, I never put weight in the back. If there is another reason to do so, I would be willing to learn:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,242 Posts
The weight distribution is 58/42. I always carried 150 lb. of sand in my Ranger in the winter even though we rarely have snow, because traction in the wet was lousy too. I see no need of carrying any with the RL. The majority of the torque already goes to the wheels with the most weight on them so I plan on letting VTM-4 do it's job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
Craig said:
I bought 2 60lb bags of sand that I put in the back of my '97 Nissan during the winter to keep the back from sliding out on the slick, snow covered roads. Has anyone done this for the ridge or is it not necessary? Being a unibody the ridgeline seems more solid and more evenly weighted in the rear than a traditional pick-up. Any thoughts?
The traction control should handle this problem unlike the old school trucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
I don't think it would need it. I drove about 20 miles on 2" of ice on a mountain pass this weekend and my RL was handling straight and true. Then the state patrol stopped everyone and made us all chain up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,056 Posts
mayfielh said:
I don't think it would need it. I drove about 20 miles on 2" of ice on a mountain pass this weekend and my RL was handling straight and true. Then the state patrol stopped everyone and made us all chain up.
You mean the RL couldn't out run the state patrol on ice? ;) :eek: Sounds like fun driving conditions...NOT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Yesterday we had our first snow storm of the season here in southeastern Idaho. With six to eight inches of snow on the ground, more falling heavily, and 34 mph winds producing drifts up to two feet high, I decided to give my RTL its initial foray out into the snow. (I have driven it since last March.) My residence is at 5000 feet elevation and part of this subdivision has extremely steep and curving streets. So, before the sand trucks and plows could get out, I toured several of the steepest, deepest in snow and most difficult streets. I passed several cars that had spun out. Also three larger pickups were stalled along the way. My RTL performed as if it were on dry pavement. No skidding. No slippage. No problem whatsoever. The automatic power-to-wheel distribution was astounding. I had no idea such performance was possible in a light truck without any weight in the bed and with OME tires. I was very impressed. My previous truck was a Ford and could only have negotiated these streets in four-wheel drive.

I also tried the VTM-4 Lock to see how the straight four-wheel drive would perform. It worked perfectly.

My guess would be that there will be no need at all for added weight to your Ridge, not to mention the need for snow/all terrain tires.

This is my fifth Honda and I really shouldn't have been surprised by the superb quality and performance of the RTL but the Honda folks have really outdone themselves with this gem of a truck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Since the Ridgeline powers the front wheels first, it would seem that old reasons to add weight to the rear (ie. rear drive pickup, light in the ass-end) would be almost pointless.

I think it's time for a new way of thinking with this Ridgeline. Seems Honda has done their homework...

??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
BlueVette said:
Since the Ridgeline powers the front wheels first, it would seem that old reasons to add weight to the rear (ie. rear drive pickup, light in the ass-end) would be almost pointless.

I think it's time for a new way of thinking with this Ridgeline. Seems Honda has done their homework...

??
The RL starts out in 4WD and then goes to FWD as its speed increases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
No weight should be necessary. Had no trouble at all, even with trying to make it spin or slip in 3-5 inches of snow recently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Wow, great information! I figured as much but as you mentioned old habits die hard. Maybe I should donate the sand bags to the less fortunate "real" pick-up owners . . . ha, ha, ha (evil laugh).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
BlueVette said:
Since the Ridgeline powers the front wheels first, it would seem that old reasons to add weight to the rear (ie. rear drive pickup, light in the ass-end) would be almost pointless.

I think it's time for a new way of thinking with this Ridgeline. Seems Honda has done their homework...

??
As Doc said, it ALWAYS starts off in AWD. I just felt that we need to point this out more because there's a lot of misconception about how the Ridgeline's drivetrain works. It only becomes FWD when conditions permit, ie light load, good traction, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Okay, I am dying for some snow now! I can't wait to try my Ridge out. Are you using the original all season (mud and snow, I think) tires?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
shingles said:
As Doc said, it ALWAYS starts off in AWD. I just felt that we need to point this out more because there's a lot of misconception about how the Ridgeline's drivetrain works. It only becomes FWD when conditions permit, ie light load, good traction, etc.
Part of that might be the way Honda markets the Ridgeline AWD/4WD system as "under normal conditions all power is sent to the front wheels."

Personally, based on this discussion, I think they need to play up the front wheel drive aspect of the Ridger. Everyone (in areas that get winter) knows that Front Wheel Drive is superior to rear wheel drive in snow and ice. Now, here's a truck that doesn't need a bed full of firewood for rear wheel traction. I think Honda Marketing needs some winter commercials. Enough with the bear eating the fish from the trunk. Let's see a Ridgeline commercial with some snow!!

I'm with Hez - bring on the white stuff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,056 Posts
shingles said:
As Doc said, it ALWAYS starts off in AWD. I just felt that we need to point this out more because there's a lot of misconception about how the Ridgeline's drivetrain works. It only becomes FWD when conditions permit, ie light load, good traction, etc.
I thought it only started off in AWD under heavy acceleration. :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,967 Posts
Craig said:
Wow, great information! I figured as much but as you mentioned old habits die hard. Maybe I should donate the sand bags to the less fortunate "real" pick-up owners . . . ha, ha, ha (evil laugh).
Use the sand in the sand box. Added weight in the rear is only for rear wheel drive vehicles.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
25 Year Honda Owner said:
Use the sand in the sand box. Added weight in the rear is only for rear wheel drive vehicles.
It might still be useful in some cases, just not as proposed in this thread. :)

According to FEMA's Winter Weather Preparedness Tips, sand and road salt should be included in a winter driving preparedness kit. They can be applied to enhance traction on slick (ice and/or snow covered) surfaces.

Submitted respectfully by a cop who doesn't want to find a frozen corpse in a vehicle that could have been dislodged by a sprinkling of salt and/or sand. :eek:

Does everyone have their kit assembled and loaded? ;)

-- Rob
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top