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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone by any chance know the Honda (OEM) part number for the stock air filter? All I can get from looking at the filter is the fact it is made by Filtech and evidently their item number (in house part number I assume?) which is on the filter reads as PP-TD30. I didn't think this number would do me any good, and as I guessed, this number was of no use in cross referencing an air filter from any other manufacturer. I tried several websites such as ACDelco, Fram, Purolator, and other websites with cross reference charts and look-ups, etc. to no avail.

I'm interested in AMSOIL's new EaA nanofiber filter, but they can't do a look up on the RL as of yet for air filters. I gave them the K&N air filter p/n: 33-2323, I got off of a thread on this forum hoping they could cross reference it, but they didn't have that either.

Following is an email I received from AMSOIL regarding the part number for their new Ea nanofiber oil filter (for those interested), as well as, their current production SDF oil filter:


***********************************************************

Thank you for contacting AMSOIL with your concerns.

In response to your inquiry, the filters cross over to the following:

Honda OEM 15400 PLM A01 --> SDF 13 or EaO 13

Mobil1 1 110 --> No cross reference

ACDelco PF2057 --> SDF 13 or EaO 13

Purolator PL14640 --> SDF 13 or EaO 13

K&N HP 1010 --> EaO 13

Fram PH7317 --> SDF 13 or EaO 13

Unfortunately we do not have a cross for the K&N air filter, sorry :-(.

Thank you again for the opportunity to respond to your concerns. As always, please feel free to contact us again if we can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,

Heidi Etterman
AMSOIL Technical Service

***********************************************************

I gave them several filter numbers besides the Honda one to make absolutely sure there was no misunderstanding.

Here are the links regarding the EaA air filter and Ea oil filter if anyone is interested: https://www.amsoil.com/storefront/eaa.aspx and https://www.amsoil.com/storefront/eao.aspx

It sounds interesting in theory anyway. I know marketing hype rules as per usual, but I'm a sucker sometimes ( maybe almost all of the time ;) ) for techno-garble whether it is actually a scientific and proven fact or not. One of my not too few character (or is it intelligence) flaws. :D

Cheers!
 

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The Honda part number for the air cleaner is 2047545. List price $20.10 and a good street price is about $15.00.

-Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #4
csimo said:
The Honda part number for the air cleaner is 2047545. List price $20.10 and a good street price is about $15.00.

-Joe
Thanks, csimo, I really appreciate the quick response!

BTW, what's your take on AMSOIL products in general? I know there's controversy when it comes to debating brand names vs. price vs. actual effectiveness especially when it comes to the subject of oil and filtration.

I've used dino for years (i.e., Castrol, Valvoline, ...) with good results of course, and as of the past several years, became sort of a synthetic fan using primarily Mobil1 in most all of my machines -- dirt bikes, cars, trucks and so on. I have always been keenly aware of the "golden rule" for long, dependable engine life regular oil AND FILTER changes are a must generally irrespective of brand or type ( dino, syn.) as long as it's a good quality product. But then again, my mind tells me one thing, and my heart tells me another. I now generally prefer a syn. formulated lubricant over petroleum based or at least a blend type -- but this is MY PERSONAL preference. Even when I use syn., my change interval is still relatively short depending on the vehicle and application. I'm still very conservative when it comes to this. I don't bother with oil analysis to see how far I can stretch it ( although that's fine for those you either require it for economic reasons -- fleet management/maintenance, or for those who just prefers this method). Cost doesn't bother me terribly either, spend $2 or $3/qt. or spend $6 or $8/qt. , spend just a couple of dollars for a filter of known good quality or $10 to $15 of known/ proven quality -- in the long run I don't do that many changes per year all total and I'd prefer to spend more on a high quality product for peace of mind (whether real or imagined!) ;). When compared to what one pays for a vehicle, the oil and filter is a very small cost no matter if it's a SuperTech brand or Mobil1, AMSOIL, Redline, what have ya! I've read plenty concerning this topic over the years and as long as there are machines requiring oil and people to use them this will always be a hot subject. Sounds like I'm trying to convince myself, doesn't it.

I needed to start talking about oil like I need another credit card!

Sorry to everyone in advance -- I went ahead and did it -- STARTED ANOTHER BLASTED OIL thread. Looks like I have nothing better to do, but sit and bore everyone with this topic, but honestly I do -- got to go and start putting my bike back together. I started this thread to find out about an air filter number and wound up talking about oil! Has anyone heard of the term, compulsive? :rolleyes: Maybe this one will die a quick and merciful death! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
swampler said:
From College Hills Honda Parts website, the part number is 17220-RJE-A00.

17220-RJE-A00 Element Assy., Air Cleaner 1 2006 Ridgeline 19.90 15.52

Thanks, swampler and csimo -- Well, nothing like diversity! :D

I guess I'll go do like I said in my last post, and stay off the computer rest of the weekend. Started talking about air filter p/n's, wound up rambling about oil, and now getting even more confused ( as if I wasn't already by nature ).
Oh, that reminds me, time for my meds! ;)

But seriously, thanks guys -- this is the best forum I've been on yet! I'm sure one, and prehaps, both numbers will work!

Really appreciate the quick responses and all inputs!

Chow for now --
Mal
 

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First off both part numbers are correct. The one I posted is Honda's part number, and the other this the accessory number. Both work.

Now on to your Amsoil question. Two parts to the answer.

First, the Amsoil oil and air filters are fine. Amsoil doesn't manufacture them, and you can usually find filters that are just as good or better for much less money.

As for Amsoil oil. I don't keep up with Amsoil much anymore, but the last I checked they had only one product line that was API Certified, and that was the XL-7500 line. That product is a synthetic blend and not the one they claim is for extended drain intervals. All of the fully synthetic Amsoil products are not API Certified.

Your Honda warranty requires you to use API Certified oil. If you don't then any potential engine warranty repairs may be out of your own pocket, or you will be in the position of trying to collect from Amsoil. It really doesn't matter to me if it's Amsoil or any other brand you should never use a non-API Certified oil.

Amsoil may make some good products, but we don't really know since they fail to subject their products to industry standard testing. They publish all kinds of supposedly "independent" tests, but most of that testing is using inappropriate tests for an internal combustion engine and are just plain worthless to me when they refuse to tell you who did the tests. For example a four ball test from an anonymous independent lab is a joke. The four ball test has little or nothing to do with an internal combustion engine (if I was testing gear lube I might give it some weight).

Extended drain intervals do not make sense for modern gasoline engines. Period. If we were driving large diesel engines (diesel fuel is not near the solvent that gasoline is) with huge tolerances and superior filtration it would make sense. Our engines have nothing in common with the real purpose of extended drain intervals. Anyone that pushes extended drain intervals is not your friend. Does this mean that our engine oil is really "worn out" at 7500 miles? Nope, but you would be much better off changing the oil and filter rather than spending about the same money for a good oil analysis to prove otherwise.

I consider Amsoil a snake oil company. They fill their representatives heads with lies... they are very effectively brainwashed into believing the invalid tests, and the various other lies told to them. The few that really take the time to learn the chemistry and physics involved feel foolish that they believed what Amsoil was pushing.

I could go on and on about this subject, but I think I hit the high points.

-Joe
 

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I agree Joe but I take issue with the oil analysis. I think much can be learned from an oil analysis - not all the time but once and a while. Not only will it tell you the condition your oil is in but also if there appears to be any problems with minerals, deposits, antifreeze in the oil problems, etc. It gives you a good idea of your engine's condition and if the engine likes the oil you are using. Bad numbers in certain areas might warrant a change in oil brand.

Also, I would really like to know if the OLM (Oil Life Monitor) that we have is accurate enough for me to trust it as to oil change intervals. I think it is but I want to be sure. A used oil analysis' TBN count will give me a good idea of oil life expectancy and I would like to compare that with what the OLM tells me. This way, I will know for sure that the assumptions made by the monitor (all it can do is make assumptions) are in the ball park with the actual, physical analysis of the oil itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
csimo said:
First off both part numbers are correct. The one I posted is Honda's part number, and the other this the accessory number. Both work.
Thanks, Joe, for the clarification.

csimo said:
As for Amsoil oil. I don't keep up with Amsoil much anymore, but the last I checked they had only one product line that was API Certified, and that was the XL-7500 line. That product is a synthetic blend and not the one they claim is for extended drain intervals. All of the fully synthetic Amsoil products are not API Certified
I checked their website again and their XLF 5w-20, 5w-30 syn. shows the following certifications: API SM/CF, SL, SJ ..., ILSAC GF-4, 3 ..., ACEA A1/B1, JASO VTW, GM 6094M, Ford WSS-M2C930-A, Daimler Chrysler MS-6395N.

Their ASL 5w-30 is the only one, however, that they specifically claim as 100% synthetic and cost around a buck more a quart. It has basically the same certifications as the 1st two with the addition of Volkswagon. So it appears the 1st two are blends as you mentioned even though they don't make this distinction.

I understand there are the so called full synthetics such as the above mentioned Amsoil, Mobil1, etc., and then there are truly full synthetics which from my understanding are not generally available to Joe Public and are rather pricey. The synthetics we generally think of and talk about have some syn. polymer structure in the base oil, but also incorporates natural, mineral (petroleum) oil additives in their structure. While the truly synthetics are just that, completely and totally man-made in the lab -- no natural components at all. While the blends are just a blend of the partial "full" synthetic (i.e., Mobil1 type syns) blended with a petroleum stock. Well, I'm no oil expert whatsoever, and definitely no chemist, but I think I'm close to understanding some basics as far as what distinguishes one from the other -- at least I hope so. From what I gather, Mobil1, AMSOIL, Redline, etc. can claim full synthetic due to some technicality in the definition, but for the life of me, I can't recall the exact reason without doing some research. These company's marketing and sales departments work overtime in exploiting this loophole.

The long and short of all of this is that I'll just stick with what I've been using and has worked well for me.

csimo said:
For example a four ball test from an anonymous independent lab is a joke. The four ball test has little or nothing to do with an internal combustion engine (if I was testing gear lube I might give it some weight)
Yes, I think I remember and understand a little about this trying to equate the 4 ball test to engines when it really demonstrates the base stock oils ability to maintain its viscous nature (polymer structure) under the shearing stress and pressures found beween the gears of a gearbox (i.e., manual trans.). Am I half way on the right track?

As far as oil analysis goes, I can see it with diesel generators, flleet vehicles, or any situation where time and money is a consideration. Long drain intervals and heavy duty applications are well suited for oil analyses, but the traditional family auto if taken care of properly and maintained to at least manufacturer standards just doesn't really require this sort of thing, unless one is just curious I guess. With the many vehicles and machines ( motorcycles, autos, lawnmowers, etc.) I've owned, maintained, and been involved with (an '87 Mazda 626 with 293,000 miles on it for example, original engine, no oil consumption to speak of at least not the burning kind) my experience just shows me that diligence in maintenance, not abusing the machine, and good record keeping to spot trends, etc. is all that is really required to keep most any machine happy and trotting along for years and/or 100's of thousands of miles. There's definitely no problem with having your oil analyzed, I just don't see that it is of any paramount necessity to the everyday guy/gal and his or her favorite ride. Just my thoughts -- no biggy!


Thanks again!

Ciao (not "chow" as is in food -- I was hungry I guess when I signed off last time):)
Mal
 

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I find it interesting that 7500 miles seems to be the top mentioned but the Civic Hybrid is set for 10000 miles between oil changes, and right now it looks like my Ridgeline will exceed 7500 before requiring an oil change. Is it odd that both of my Hondas are exceeding what oil companies are calling extended? I am going by what the Honda manuals and vehicles tell me. I have to assume that they aren't going to slap a warranty on the vehicles without some assurance in their head that a majority of them won't have problems based on their recommendations.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
captmiddy, I was going to mention the same thing earlier about my OLM indicating 50% left when I hit somewhere around or between 3800 -3900 miles. I mostly drive open country roads/highways with some town and city mixed in. Only been on the freeway once so far for about 150 miles. I'm at around 4400 and it's still showing 50%. It has made me start to wonder a little, and I thought to my self more than once if the thing is even working anymore. It kind of makes me want to just schedule my changes based on mileage like I'm used to anyway. Technology, the more advanced, the more there is to go wrong -- Murphy always seems to work overtime!

-- Mal

P.S. should have changed the name of this thread, boy, what was that about air fliter numbers?
 

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A few messages to show you how deceptive Amsoil can be. I'll select only those products that would probably be used in the Ridgeline.

Series 2000 Synthetic 0W-30 Motor Oil.
"AMSOIL Series 2000 Synthetic 0W-30 Motor Oil meets or exceeds the engine protection requirements of all domestic and foreign gasoline and diesel engines specifying the following:

  • API SL/CF, SJ, SH"
Is this product API Certified and meets the requirements for warranty coverage by Honda?
 

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Or what about Amsoil Extended Life 5W-20 Synthetic Motor Oil (XLM)

"AMSOIL Extended Life Synthetic Motor Oils are excellent for use in all types of gasoline-fueled vehicles. They are recommended for all domestic and foreign vehicles requiring any of the listed performance specifications:
XLM 5W-20 Synthetic Motor Oil
  • API SM/CF, SL, SJ ...



 

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Or this one Amsoil Extended Life 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil (XLF)

"AMSOIL Extended Life Synthetic Motor Oils are excellent for use in all types of gasoline-fueled vehicles. They are recommended for all domestic and foreign vehicles requiring any of the listed performance specifications:
XLM 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil
  • API SM/CF, SL, SJ ..."
 

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How many of you could read Amsoil's site, or look at their descriptions and know the first two (their higher priced products) are NOT API Certified products. The second two... the cheaper ones... are API Certified.

Notice how deceptive the description is? Wouldn't you think that the first two are API Certified? Look at the API Certified starburst on the second two and see how Amsoil tried to "simulate" the starburst on the non-certified products?

Any company that would do such things is not for me.

-Joe
 

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Just FYI. If you wonder what the Owners Manual actually says about using API Certified oil you can read it below. Pages 236 and 237.
 

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