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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
According to online sources, the stock wheels on the 2017 Honda Ridgeline are 18x8 with a 5x120 bolt pattern and a 55mm offset. I was thinking about a set of BBS Rims from TireRack (see link below)

These BBS rims have an offset of 32mm which would push the new wheel outboard. Most aftermarket wheels have offsets considerably smaller than the stock 55mm. From what I've read, pushing a wheel outboard (all else being equal) is not necessarily a good thing as it increases stress and potential wear on suspension components. I also read on a professional site that in choosing an aftermarket wheel, the new offset should NOT deviate more than 5mm from the stock number.

The last thing I want to do is increase stress and wear on my vehicle. However, with most quality aftermarket rims significantly different in terms of offset, it seems like changing rims isn't a good idea. Any thoughts on this matter would be appreciated as I need some knowledgeable advice.

Below is the link to the BBS wheels I was looking at on TireRack

Thanks

Dave

BBS SR Anthracite Painted
 

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2017 Ridgeline RTL-E | Northeast U.S.
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I have been holding back on a purchase while trying to find the offset number as well. In my case if it's 55 mm, I'm going to scour the earth for 55 mm wheels. But from a little research I've done so far, they are not common. Wouldn't the offset for the Pilot be the same. There's a wheelset that supposed to be compatible with both vehicles. Is there a way you can measure the offset? Sorry, I'm pretty ignorant about these details.
 

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Here is my OPINION...

Increased (positive] offset is usually associated with increased stress on suspension components, more so than decreased offset, due to the way the suspension leverages on the wheel hub. You likely won't increase offset anyway, as there is very little room to move the wheel inward on the Ridgeline.

So, moving the wheel outward (decreasing offset, in our case) is generally a little safer. What are the downsides? 1) Handling may be adversely affected, and this will affect different drivers differently. 2) wheels and tires will likely protrude from the wheel well - this can impact aerodynamics and reduce MPG while increasing wind noise; it may also pose a safety hazard and therefore possibly illegal in some locale. You are also more likely to kiss the curb when parallel parking, or pulling up to the ATM or Burger King drive-thru.

I suspect that the suspension components will not be too stressed if you move the wheels out an inch or two. I say this because the parts are somewhat over built for most applications. If you are constantly near max payload, or Xcross racing on the weekends with your truck, then it is probably not a good idea to deviate from stock. For all other under-stressed uses, however, I think you'll be ok. I also say the suspension parts are probably a bit over built because Honda did not have a large budget for this truck - a larger budget would have allowed for more finite engineering (over-engineering, if you will), that would have put the components within much closer tolerances regarding their capabilities and predicted lifespan. If you don't have the budget for that additional engineering, then you simply build the part a little heavier to hedge your bets. Benefit = lower cost to R&D and produce...Drawback = part is heavier than necessary and uses more raw materials than necessary. As an example, metal used on car bodies is much thinner nowadays because engineers have determined the best balance, using finite engineering, between strength needed, weight needed, and strength value of stressing the steel.

With all of that said, IMO, you will be OK going to 32mm if you don't overload the truck and you don't mind the MPG/noise/safety penalties. Again, this is all my opinion, and YMMV!
 

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Thanks for that detailed and insightful post. I think I finally have the beginner's handle on offset.

OP, where did you get the 55mm number? I will help you verify it.
 

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Offset is usually stamped on the inside of the wheel. I think someone posted a picture of a 2017 RL wheel taken from the inside. Also, some tire and wheel websites will show you the offset for the factory wheel when you enter your vehicle info...but you would want to confirm that spec from the automaker too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I saw a listing on ebay for a stock 2017 Ridgeline rim. Under the details, it was listed as 55mm offset. Also, I inquired at TireRack and they too said 55mm.

One of the forum users pointed out that the BBS rim I like is indeed offered in a 44mm offset as opposed to 32mm which I didn't notice the 1st time around.

However, I'm concerned as the site where they really seem like they know their stuff said deviating more than 5mm either way from stock offset is NOT a good idea.

If anybody else who is knowledgeable can weigh in, please do.

Thanks
Dave
 

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IMO, the stock offset leaves me wanting more. The wheels look like they are too small and out of place. I would afraid that I wouldn't be happy with an aftermarket set that had the same offset. Like I didn't get all I was hoping for. I would almost prefer to see the stock wheels pushed out about 10mm to fill out the space a little better.

I have Camaro SS replica wheels on my G1 with a 35mm offset and they look perfects.

I think a 44mm would be a happy medium.

Just my $0.02.
 

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Stock specs are 18x8" with 55mm offset and weigh 27.5 lb.

Detroit Auto Show Ridgelines were said to be rubbing their up-sized 265/60/18 Destination ATs at full lock on the inboard edges.

Reducing wheel offset value to 40-ish mm pushes the wheel outward ~ 0.5" which might help a potential rub issue on larger diameter (255/60 or 265/60) setups. I'm considering some of these wheels in either 18 or 17 diameter.

These 21 lb options shave 6-ish lb per corner of rotating & unsprung weight vs. stock.

Tire-wise, I'm trying stay as close to stock Destination LE 245/60/18's weight (31 lb) and 29.6" height as possible. Leaning toward Michelin Premier LTX for good reviews & light weight, but tempted by versatility of Destination ATs (albeit 8 lbs heavier than LTXs which negates the weight savings of the wheels...)

More info in the thread below:
http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/2105689-post3.html
 

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Stock specs are 18x8" with 55mm offset and weigh 27.5 lb...Reducing wheel offset value to 40-ish mm pushes the wheel outward ~ 0.5" which might help a potential rub issue on larger diameter (255/60 or 265/60) setups. I'm considering some of these wheels in either 18 or 17 diameter...
Which stock G2 wheel weighs 27.5 lb? As you know, there are several factory wheel options for the G2. I'm not sure but I think the RTS comes with the stock 2016 Pilot wheels (18"). It would be interesting to see how close the weights are for all of the available factory wheels on G2 RLs.

Another poster noted a much wider selection of AT tires for 17" wheels compared to 18" wheels. And still another poster said if you reduce wheel offset, you start to see rubbing on the outer edges of tires larger than the stock 245/60's. Honda really constrained the front wheel well clearances on the Pilot/Ridgeline in pursuit of less air turbulence and better fuel efficiency. They've really made it hard to upsize the tires without having issues.
 

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What drives me nuts is the fact that no one makes an aftermarket alloy wheel for Honda cars or trucks that's hubcentric. Significantly, all of Honda's optional alloys are hubcentric. This makes a huge difference when you're trying to balance a 27 lb. wheel and a 50+ lb. tire.
 

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Be careful if you go messing around with that offset. In addition to the suspension components, I'm sure the bearings wouldn't be too happy about the additional load they'd be supporting. Maybe not a huge deal unloaded, but toss in a payload and you might start operating outside of their specs. Something to keep in mind.
 

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Stock specs are 18x8" with 55mm offset and weigh 27.5 lb.

Detroit Auto Show Ridgelines were said to be rubbing their up-sized 265/60/18 Destination ATs at full lock on the inboard edges.

Reducing wheel offset value to 40-ish mm pushes the wheel outward ~ 0.5" which might help a potential rub issue on larger diameter (255/60 or 265/60) setups. I'm considering some of these wheels in either 18 or 17 diameter.

These 21 lb options shave 6-ish lb per corner of rotating & unsprung weight vs. stock.

Tire-wise, I'm trying stay as close to stock Destination LE 245/60/18's weight (31 lb) and 29.6" height as possible. Leaning toward Michelin Premier LTX for good reviews & light weight, but tempted by versatility of Destination ATs (albeit 8 lbs heavier than LTXs which negates the weight savings of the wheels...)
exactly the winter tires I am looking at. I love Michelin tires. I will be replacing (and selling) the stock firestone tires and wheels. I am looking at Michelin defenders in stock size for the rest of the year. All I need is the truck. :wink:
 
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