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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, recently my steering wheel has been shaking mildly and more violently at fairly low braking speeds (40-60km/h). I was curious if anyone had an idea what's causing this? Or if it's normal... Thanks guys!


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Most likely that the (a) brake rotor(s) have warped - caused by overtighting the lugnuts on the wheels.
 

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As Larry says it is most likely an issue with your rotors. I have had this issue on and off since my 06 was new. In 110k I have replaced the front rotors twice and the rear ones once. I personally don't think that it is solely (if at all) a lug nut issue but rather a function of a heavy vehicle, combined with (in my case) lots of stop and go traffic and perhaps some issues with calipers not floating as freely as they should and the pins which seem to be prone to sticking.

Are you going to have a shop take a look or tackle the issue yourself?
 

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Most likely that the (a) brake rotor(s) have warped - caused by overtighting the lugnuts on the wheels.
...and overheating caused by aggressive braking or towing without trailer brakes or riding the brakes or driving through water while the rotors are hot causing rapid cooling.

I've never had any rotor issues with any of my three Ridgelines - they've all braked as smooth as possible. Some vehicle are more prone to warped rotors - I had a '91 Tempo that constantly warped rotors no matter how carefully the lug nuts were tightened or how gently I drove. Back then, the rotors for this car were $11 each, so I just replaced them every few months.
 

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163k, same symptoms, warped rotor. Just changed the front rotors a second time (and before that had turned the OEM ones once). I paid extra attention to the install this time, cleaning and lubed the pad slides and the slider pins. Always torque the nuts with a torque wrench.
 

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Your flux capacitor is broken and needs a recharge. Put on new pads and rotors and drive backwards up a 30% incline while humming the national anthem. You'll be good to go.
 

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Warped Rotors
 

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Your flux capacitor is broken and needs a recharge. Put on new pads and rotors and drive backwards up a 30% incline while humming the national anthem. You'll be good to go.
warped rotors and humor.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As Larry says it is most likely an issue with your rotors. I have had this issue on and off since my 06 was new. In 110k I have replaced the front rotors twice and the rear ones once. I personally don't think that it is solely (if at all) a lug nut issue but rather a function of a heavy vehicle, combined with (in my case) lots of stop and go traffic and perhaps some issues with calipers not floating as freely as they should and the pins which seem to be prone to sticking.



Are you going to have a shop take a look or tackle the issue yourself?

I to have an 06 with 202km, and I'll be taking it to my mechanic, not gonna do this my self... Thanks for the help!!


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Discussion Starter #10
...and overheating caused by aggressive braking or towing without trailer brakes or riding the brakes or driving through water while the rotors are hot causing rapid cooling.

I've never had any rotor issues with any of my three Ridgelines - they've all braked as smooth as possible. Some vehicle are more prone to warped rotors - I had a '91 Tempo that constantly warped rotors no matter how carefully the lug nuts were tightened or how gently I drove. Back then, the rotors for this car were $11 each, so I just replaced them every few months.

I don't tow anything and don't really have any plans to, never drive in water, definitely not a brake rider! Thanks also for your input, appreciate it!


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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks to everyone for the help and support! I really do appreciate it, I'll be taking my ridge to the mechanic soon... Thanks again!!!


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Never had issue with Ridgeline 147,500 mile range.
Not shared primary driver of vehicle after 2nd year of ownership but primary person to have most service done since new. Know how other person operates vehicle. Had similar problems with 2000 Acura TL but not as much as 94 and 90 Accords over tighten lug nuts.
 

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I read somewhere that the issue is not warped rotors, but rather that the pads leave uneven deposits on the rotors and that light braking contributes to the issue. If that be the case, then resurfacing the rotor should fix the issue.

I have not replaced/resurfaced a rotor on any of my vehicles. I slap new pads on there and go!
 

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I read somewhere that the issue is not warped rotors, but rather that the pads leave uneven deposits on the rotors and that light braking contributes to the issue. If that be the case, then resurfacing the rotor should fix the issue.

I have not replaced/resurfaced a rotor on any of my vehicles. I slap new pads on there and go!

+1 The rotors haven't been off after 140,000 miles.
 

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I read somewhere that the issue is not warped rotors, but rather that the pads leave uneven deposits on the rotors and that light braking contributes to the issue. If that be the case, then resurfacing the rotor should fix the issue.

I have not replaced/resurfaced a rotor on any of my vehicles. I slap new pads on there and go!
That is exactly correct. Rotors don't warp in a traditional sense, but run-out occurs because of pad deposits. I rarely resurface rotors anymore, because the tolerances are so small. Most people use a micrometer on a rotor BEFORE they resurface it. There is no certain way to determine how much material must be removed before putting it on the lathe. The time to mike a rotor is after it has been resurfaced. If it is even close to the minimum thickness, I would discard it and get a new one. These days manufacturers make rotors as thin as possible to try to save weight for mileage while still providing enough heat distribution. These days, one can purchase quality rotors and pads either online or at the parts store for a reasonable price. Who wants to have to do a brake job twice, because of vibration. Go online and do your research on brake pads and rotors. You can find dozens of choices at tirerack.com, rockauto.com, ebay, and others. During my auto repair career, I had more trouble with Honda brakes making noise and vibrating than any other, except for 1996-2001 4Runners. Back in the 80s and 90s, Honda made many of their vehicles with rotors that did not pop off. Their recommended method of resurfacing rotors was on the vehicle with a special machine, which I purchased. Along those lines, if one has a vehicle that continually has brake vibrations, the issue might be in bearing lateral run-out, or a slight bit of motion from one side to the other causing deposition of material on the rotor. In that case, the only method of eliminating the run-out is to resurface the rotors on the vehicle with the on-the-car brake lathe.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That is exactly correct. Rotors don't warp in a traditional sense, but run-out occurs because of pad deposits. I rarely resurface rotors anymore, because the tolerances are so small. Most people use a micrometer on a rotor BEFORE they resurface it. There is no certain way to determine how much material must be removed before putting it on the lathe. The time to mike a rotor is after it has been resurfaced. If it is even close to the minimum thickness, I would discard it and get a new one. These days manufacturers make rotors as thin as possible to try to save weight for mileage while still providing enough heat distribution. These days, one can purchase quality rotors and pads either online or at the parts store for a reasonable price. Who wants to have to do a brake job twice, because of vibration. Go online and do your research on brake pads and rotors. You can find dozens of choices at tirerack.com, rockauto.com, ebay, and others. During my auto repair career, I had more trouble with Honda brakes making noise and vibrating than any other, except for 1996-2001 4Runners. Back in the 80s and 90s, Honda made many of their vehicles with rotors that did not pop off. Their recommended method of resurfacing rotors was on the vehicle with a special machine, which I purchased. Along those lines, if one has a vehicle that continually has brake vibrations, the issue might be in bearing lateral run-out, or a slight bit of motion from one side to the other causing deposition of material on the rotor. In that case, the only method of eliminating the run-out is to resurface the rotors on the vehicle with the on-the-car brake lathe.

My brakes were just done not to long ago also, which was why I was confused as to why this was happening. Thanks so much for your input, I'll take all of this into consideration when seeing my mechanic, just hopefully it won't cost me an arm and a leg to have this fixed... Thanks again!



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Discussion Starter #17
I read somewhere that the issue is not warped rotors, but rather that the pads leave uneven deposits on the rotors and that light braking contributes to the issue. If that be the case, then resurfacing the rotor should fix the issue.



I have not replaced/resurfaced a rotor on any of my vehicles. I slap new pads on there and go!

May be the issue, I rarely need to brake hard and have no need for highway so I'm not really braking at high speeds, thanks for the help!!


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If the brakes were just done not long ago (I assume you just mean the pads were replaced), the pads may not be seating into the rotor well enough. However, the likely cause would be sticking caliper slide pins. If the pins weren't properly cleaned and lubed, the pads wouldn't slide evenly and make good contact with the rotor - causing a vibration. As was mentioned, uneven lug nut torque is the number one cause of warped rotors. Ensure that whomever puts the wheels back on uses a torque wrench and tightens to the proper 94lb/ft. I'm still on my OEM rotors at nearly 149k miles and nine years of service. Still plenty of meat left on them. Never turned or resurfaced, either. Been through three sets of pads on the front and four on the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If the brakes were just done not long ago (I assume you just mean the pads were replaced), the pads may not be seating into the rotor well enough. However, the likely cause would be sticking caliper slide pins. If the pins weren't properly cleaned and lubed, the pads wouldn't slide evenly and make good contact with the rotor - causing a vibration. As was mentioned, uneven lug nut torque is the number one cause of warped rotors. Ensure that whomever puts the wheels back on uses a torque wrench and tightens to the proper 94lb/ft. I'm still on my OEM rotors at nearly 149k miles and nine years of service. Still plenty of meat left on them. Never turned or resurfaced, either. Been through three sets of pads on the front and four on the rear.

Went over to my mechanics the other day, it's warped rotors most likely, but he's not 100% until we get it up on the lift.... Back there tmmr to get it all sorted, thanks for the help! I'll make sure it's done properly. Never had an issue with these guys so it should be fine


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I read somewhere that the issue is not warped rotors, but rather that the pads leave uneven deposits on the rotors and that light braking contributes to the issue. If that be the case, then resurfacing the rotor should fix the issue.

I have not replaced/resurfaced a rotor on any of my vehicles. I slap new pads on there and go!
I know of one mechanic that typically dresses (his words) rotors on the vehicle. He usually does this by the 2nd pad replacement if everything else is in spec.
He does it exactly for the reason you stated, deposits.
He claims the amount of metal removed is minimal, but the removal of deposits ensures optimal bedding of the new pad.

Once I had him do the front brakes on our 03 CRV at 80K. I purchased a set of pads and rotors from TireRack. He did the usual rotor dressing...When he was done I returned the new disks for a refund. The old ones were still in spec.
I guess he is a little OC. Like every morning before opening the doors he uses a blower to get rid of all the dirt & dust around the drive way to the stalls.

I can't fault him, his prices are reasonable and the work is exemplary.
 
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