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Discussion Starter #1
I already am aware of possible issues with the climate control system in the Ridgeline as the temps drop, but I am more curious in how well the Ridgeline does mechanically when temps drop below zero?

Bill
 

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I have a 2017 RTLE and live in Wisconsin where temperatures are frequently well below zero and sometimes approaching 30 degrees below zero. My '17 has been used through three winters without any issues and nicely warms the interior front and rear on the coldest days. Warm-up is very rapid making all occupants comfortable on the windiest cold days.

How did you become aware of a problem that may not exist?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
We're moving back to Montana from a much milder climate here in southern Oregon and am just looking for some insight of what to expect. For example, with our 70's pickups transmissions and differentials become stiff, the diesel engine in our Jetta gets somewhat reluctant to start, things like this?

Bill
 

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Remote start is a nice option to have when it gets that cold. I've gone through 2 New England Winters (and I don't have a garage) and my RTL-E has been great. The snow traction is awesome.
 

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The Ridgeline is awesome in snow or freezing temps. The truck runs fine and the traction control systems really shine.

Out of 4 Gen 1s and 2 Gen 2s only one had a block heater. If it's really arctic and windy where you are moving you might want to add one. Otherwise it's good to go.
 

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I drove in a Blizzard from Albany to Boston and back a few winters back. The temps were anywhere from negative teens to lower single digits. Mechanically the RL was great and with snows as sure footed as a donkey and never struggled while I could see others struggling.. As you must already know, I couldn't keep the cabin warm if the defrost was needed. The trip was over 9 hours so if defrost is needed for road spray/interior fogging I couldn't find a proper balance. Fortunately this a rare occurrence but could be common up there in Montana. Also, in lower trimmed models like my RTS, the heated mirrors were missed, never really knew about this until that day as I have it in my other vehicles. And of course, if driving at night on a country road, high beams are a must, the low beams are weak..Last winter I picked up my daughter from college in a rare event of snow squalls. Temps weren't below zero so no fogging issues. As much as I complain about the quality on my RL that day I knew that traction trumped everything. The RL made it look easy. When I was the lead car I didn't know how fast I could go but no one passed me with the exception of a semi. Overall, when the winter weather gets crappy a RL if have to be on the road, is a good place to be. I guess in Montana you will be putting your RL to the test because it's extreme there. Curious if folks still use block heaters.
 

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I haven't driven the G2 in subzero temps yet, but I did drive it in fresh snow. I also drove our 2008 Accord in that same fresh snow. The Accord had blizzaks on it and it was more sure-footed in the snow than the G2 with oem tires.

(Now, if the snow had been deeper than, say, 8 inches, then the Ridgeline would probably have been the better vehicle in the snow, despite having slippery tires.)

My point here is that if you tend to drive in snowy conditions, a FWD with snow tires will trump an AWD/4wd with all-season tires in moderate snowfalls. My plan is to get a set of winter tires for the G2 when that season approaches, and have the best snow machine for highway driving.

What part of Montana? The prairie tends to have much harsher weather than the mountains.
 

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I thought this was a recent winter time post said to myself where is it cold now.
Heck it's 90 degrees in DC feels like 92 and it's cloudy.
 

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Bill, I’ve had my 2017 RTL-E since Aug 2016. We currently live in northern Illinois (near Wisconsin border), but have taken frequent trips to Wisconsin and Minnesota (where I grew up) to visit family & friends. That includes winter driving in all 3 states, with snow and sometimes icy roads, and cold snaps down to -24F actual temp (not wind chill). And all on my OEM Firestone Destination tires.

In that winter/cold driving, I’m been pleased with my Ridgeline. Its AWD handling is a real beast in that weather (what I would imagine an Audi Quattro winter rally race car to be). My OEM tires have worked well enough for me - the deepest snow I’ve been in is maybe only 7 inches (the roads are plowed fast on my routes). If I were to encounter deeper snows more often, I may consider separate winter tires/wheels - but right now, I don’t that extra expense & road noise. In our coldest snap since Aug 2016 (-24F low at night, -14F high next day!), it started up and ran fine (no “stiffness” or other mechanical issues). As others have noted, its inside heater could be stronger (though for me, it wasn’t unacceptable). I also had the Honda engine block heater installed (an old Minnesota habit), though I didn’t use it during that -24F cold snap (no place to plug in).

If I were moving to the rural boonies in north-most states, I’d consider (1) separate dedicated winter tires/wheels, (2) engine block heater, ROC thread Anyone installed the block heater?, and (3) big splash guards or flaps to shield the nasty salt/sand spray - ROC threads Adding mud flaps to OEM Splash Guard accessory (with pics) and Did you adapt or replace the useless factory mudflaps? . But you could always see how it goes without them first, and add some/all as you need.

Good luck on your move - I’ve always liked Montana.
 
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