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I have a 2013 Ridgeline with 38,000 miles, but it is 7 years old. My dealer recommended changing the timing belt. My manual says at 60,000 under severe usage or 100,000 normal usage. I can't find anything that gives a time-only for changing the belt. What do you think?
 

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As long as you have not abused the vehicle I think you'd be ok to at least the 60k and further. Normal driving and light duty you should be good to go for a while.
 

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This is one of those decisions that can drive you crazy. I have a ‘12 Sport and I just had mine done, and my vehicle has a lot LESS miles on it then yours. Why, peace of mind.

If you research this you will get a number of great thoughts and opinions, but it comes down to what you feel comfortable doing or not doing.

Back when Ridgeline first came out the maintenance schedule listed the timing belt change as 105K or 7 years. Somewhere along the way the 7 year change disappeared. Not sure why, perhaps better belt design, specs........

As some have mentioned the timing belt failures seem to occur after the original timing belt was replaced. Now what we may not know about these failures are some of the facts, like were OEM parts used and who did the installation.

What we do know is if the timing belt fails, we have a major, major issue.

P.s. my mechanic thought my belt would be fine not changing it out until about the 10 year mark, but it was a guess on his part. Again, changing my belt was for piece of mind. I plan on keeping my Ridgeline for at least 15 years, so I am a little over half way there.
 

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This will ultimately come down to personal choice. My 14 has 50k miles on it and I wouldn't even consider changing the belt till the 10 year mark. More likely I will wait till the MM code comes up at the 105k mile mark.
 

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We did our 06 at the ten year mark with around 90K miles. More of a peace of mind issue. Vehicle had been in two weather extremes; 3 years in Alaska and 7 years in Las Vegas heat.
 

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As previously stated, the vast majority (all?) of the timing belt failures I've seen reported here occurred after the original timing belt was replaced which leads me to suspect inferior parts and/or installation error.

The timing belt recall that affected some 2018-2019 Hondas and Acuras last year would prompt me to have the job done at a Honda dealership using OE parts if for no other reason than traceability. What lead to that recall was a manufacturing issue where one of the molds that the timing belt manufacturer used was defective resulting in improper vulcanization. Because the belts were lot-coded, Honda knew exactly which vehicles to recall and inspect for faulty belts and replace them (or engine that failed as a result) as necessary.

This got me to thinking that if you didn't buy an OE belt and have it installed at a Honda dealer, there would be no traceability in the event another manufacturing error occurred. If it broke, you might be out the cost of a new engine. If an OE belt was sold and replaced by a Honda dealer, that information would be associated with the VIN so that it could be recalled, if necessary.

Lots to think about!
 

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I have a 2013 Ridgeline with 38,000 miles, but it is 7 years old. ...
So you are averaging 5400 miles per year. At this rate, it will take you 20 years to hit the recommended "normal use" service.

If you have a cross-country trip planned in the near future, I'd probably take the risk of riding with the original belt. If you are planning to continue your current 5400 miles per year, I'd ride it a couple more years. I would not try to ride out the 20 years.

I agree going dealership and oem parts on this service. My local dealership sometimes offers discount for timing belt service. Catch a good offer and I'd consider it.
 

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I would ask the dealer why he is recommending the service. I thought Honda only recommends early replacement for severe driving conditions.
 

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I would ask the dealer why he is recommending the service. I thought Honda only recommends early replacement for severe driving conditions.
Most main Honda dealers I have dealt with over the past 15 years will recommend servicing that isn't "required". Mine even tried to sell me a service package of (unnecessary) mileage-based services when I purchased my truck.
 

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So you are averaging 5400 miles per year. At this rate, it will take you 20 years to hit the recommended "normal use" service.

If you have a cross-country trip planned in the near future, I'd probably take the risk of riding with the original belt. If you are planning to continue your current 5400 miles per year, I'd ride it a couple more years. I would not try to ride out the 20 years.
Your logic is correct. Age is also a factor, not just the miles on the MM. Typically anything made of rubber or similar polymers, end up deteriorating with time. It would be wise to change the timing belt at around 9-yrs, even if the vehicle mileage is under the recommend limit.
 
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