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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2019 2WD RTL-T
I know it has a 3500 towing capacity

looking to tow an Rpod 179 which according to the salesperson the model they have available has a dry weight of : 2932 lbs

in addition( if I’m able to tow this) , would I need a weight distribution hatch.

and will I only need to add a hatch ball to the truck if I don’t need a WDH ( I’ve read Honda doesn’t recommend the WDH)




not sure if I’m leaving somehting
 

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You also have to take into account. 1: water, and if you have a toilet, liquid for it. 2: food. 3. Added gear. So your already getting close to your limit. And then you add anything you put in the bed and then people.

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Why do folks try to make this so confusing, believe me, I do not have a clue. I do not believe that the 2WD Ridgeline comes with a factory mounted hitch? If not, have a Class 3 hitch that is designed for your Ridgeline properly mounted. You will be under the towing capacity for your vehicle by approximately 500 pounds, simply when loading try to keep it under that 3500#, a lil over should not do any harm if required. 10% of that weight is approximately 300 to 350 pounds hitch weight, do you want a weight distribution hitch? Simply by looking at your vehicle with the trailer hooked up should provide you with a common sense answer. Otherwise, purely a matter of personal preference, where when the trailer is loaded to provide proper weight distribution to the hitch, if the trailer does not make the tow vehicle sag too badly, I would try a short trip first without a WDH and see how comfortable you are with the set-up, and then make your decision.

Bill
 

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and will I only need to add a hatch ball to the truck ..... not sure if I’m leaving somehting
Your 2019 FWD RTL-T includes the trailer hitch receiver and is "pre-wired" for a 7-pin connector.

"Pre-wired" means the socket that the trailer plugs into and some wiring and other components that install inside the RL cabin are NOT included from the factory. Those items are available from Honda as the accessory Trailer Hitch Harness PN 08L91-T6Z-100. That kit, or an aftermarket substitute, is necessary to run the lights and operate the electric brakes which are on the r-pod 179. Installation instructions for your 2019 FWD RTL-T are attached FYI. IMO the easiest way to get this necessary lighting and brake-controller support is to have a Honda Dealer install it. Note all in this paragraph relates to your FWD RTL-T; IF you had the AWD RTL-T all this would already be installed, but you don't, so that's that.

Further, after the Honda Trailer Hitch Harness is installed, you will also need a Trailer Brake Controller (TBC) to actuate the brakes on the r-pod 179. Honda does not make a TBC, there are many aftermarket units to choose from. The place selling you the trailer may be the easiest source for a TBC + installation.

Yes, you will also need a drawbar with the proper 'drop dimension' for your trailer (the piece that fits into the receiver already under your rear bumper) and the ball itself that fits to the drawbar and your trailer. Those can probably be sourced easiest at the place selling you the trailer.

None of this has to be "confusing" but it is a thing that's apparently new to you, so yes, it involves acquiring new knowledge and learning new skills to pull an RV safely and in a manner that makes it fun and relaxing.

( I’ve read Honda doesn’t recommend the WDH)
That, BTW, is incorrect for the Gen 2 Ridgeline. Please read your Owner's Manual (the full Manual you can download from the Hondo Owner website, different from the Owner's "Guide" included with your truck) where you'll find that Honda specifically contemplates / addresses the use of a properly set-up WDH. That's not to say they state it as a requirement, just saying they are OK with a WDH on the Gen 2 RL when properly installed and used. The pros and cons of using a WDH will depend on your specific equipment and preferences.
 

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If your are going to tow frequently I would also plan on installing the factory (or aftermarket) transmission cooler that comes stock on the AWD Ridgelines.
 

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It's too much weight to tow for the 2WD RL - there is more to determining capacity than just the trailer weight
If you add 2 adults - gear in the truck and trailer - water - fuel - you are asking for issues
 

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Does the tow capacity between a similarly equipped FWD Ridgeline and an AWD Ridgeline really just come down to rear wheel drive traction of the AWD?

Bill
 

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Does the tow capacity between a similarly equipped FWD Ridgeline and an AWD Ridgeline really just come down to rear wheel drive traction of the AWD?

Bill
Don't forget the transmission cooler. Depending on the conditions of the towing, either the cooling or additional traction will be helpful in an increased load. I can't broadly say one is better than the other.

-Mike
 

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Don't forget the transmission cooler. Depending on the conditions of the towing, either the cooling or additional traction will be helpful in an increased load. I can't broadly say one is better than the other.

-Mike
Does the tow capacity between a similarly equipped FWD Ridgeline and an AWD Ridgeline really just come down to rear wheel drive traction of the AWD?

Bill
:unsure:

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #10
hi everyone
Really appreciate the comments... it’s been helpful.
This is my first truck and NOW I wish I would of gone w the AWD version but that’s that.

sorry if the heading made it sound like I had absolutely no clue. I read other treads on here and it was a lot of info.

thanks again. Dan
 

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Just to confuse the issue further, what has been called a drawbar in an earlier post is also known as a ball mount. If it hasn't already been said, the hitch you install should have a two-inch receiver. In my opinion, a stainless steel ball and ball mount are more desirable than the non-stainless, galvanized, or chrome version. I have always gotten good information from etrailer.com even if I did not purchase from them.
 

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No 2WD Ridgeline is delivered to a dealer with a OTA (oil to air) transmission cooler so "similarly equipped" in the way you mean it would be either a dealer or DIY add on.
On an AWD vehicle the portion of the drive load that the rear wheels carry (even if it is not really all the time) is certainly a contributor to tow capacity as is traction and added stability under power.
 

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If I was the OP I would be thoroughly confused by now. Let's not confuse trailer weight with payload. Payload is the weight on the truck, which would be tongue weight plus contents in cab and bed.
 

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What has ever happened to the days when you had a hitch welded to the family car or station wagon, load both the trailer and car up, assuring both vehicles are semi-level, and then just go? For heavens sake, this is simple matter of just going camping, it is not a space shuttle mission! :rolleyes:

Bill
 

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A dealership may not install an auxiliary cooler on a FWD Rigi. To my knowledge, Honda does not have a specific cooler part number for the Rigi......they do for the Pilot and Passport. I think the AWD Passport is rated for 5K lbs towing ONLY if the Honda auxiliary cooler is installed.....no auxiliary cooler, 3.5K lb towing max.
 

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What has ever happened to the days when you had a hitch welded to the family car or station wagon, load both the trailer and car up, assuring both vehicles are semi-level, and then just go? For heavens sake, this is simple matter of just going camping, it is not a space shuttle mission! :rolleyes:

Bill
Those were body-on-ladder frame vehicles with huge (by today's standards) V8's, , when gas was as cheap as water.

Our '74 AMC Ambassador had a "small" Chrysler 360 in it, gigantic sway bars, but could still only tow max 5000#...
 

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What has ever happened to the days when you had a hitch welded to the family car or station wagon, load both the trailer and car up, assuring both vehicles are semi-level, and then just go? For heavens sake, this is simple matter of just going camping, it is not a space shuttle mission! :rolleyes:

Bill
You might find it both interesting and enlightening to consider trends in trailer weights per comparable trailer length over time. One source of information for doing that is this website which provides historic weight specs for the Airstream line of trailers. We refer to the current Airstream website for current model data.

If we focus on the 23' trailers (chosen because that's a length available in the current Airstream line for comparison) we note a general trend of weight increase from 3500~3860# (depending on exact model/floorplan) in 1969-1970 to 3905# in 1979. Then, when we look at current 23' Airstream offerings (there are 3 models) ranging from 4761~5297#.

Tongue weight over those same periods crept up from ~420# to 500# and then in the current models 591~664#.

Why is this when we expect that technology has given us lighter and stronger materials with the passage of time? I suspect it's because consumers have demanded more and more 'amenities' over that same passage of time, and that's added net weight in spite of materials advances.

Is Airstream a typical manufacturer? No, I'm not suggesting that. It's very difficult to find RV manufacturers with a long history of operation for making such an evaluation. But, I suspect that the trend evidenced in Airstream data is fairly typical of the industry at large. As a trend folks want more 'stuff and amenities' in their trailers of a given length; slide-outs for just one example (which Airstream has avoided) are now very much in demand and add a lot of weight in structure and mechanisms required by them.

Yes, in the very recent past there's been a trend of offering some truly lighter and more 'bare bones' trailers in a given length, but those are still a bit of a novelty and haven't really gained wide acceptance. Mostly what we see are trailers touted as 'lightweight', but that's relative to other modern 'bloated' trailers and often upon close examination we find they really aren't that much lighter. Marketing vs reality.

Over those same years we find that the general trend of vehicles with a given tow rating is that they are lighter, shorter wheelbase, and unibody vs body-on-frame. All those factors tend to mitigate against comparable towing experiences. On the drivetrain-side we see a trend toward lower displacement per HP/TQ, much more reliance on complex technologies, greater use of alloys other than iron/steel, and engines tending to operate at their design-limits a higher % of the time when towing. Heat-stress management is often taxed to the limits as a result of all of that.

Of course there are exceptions to all of this, but when one makes broad-brushed statements about 'the good old days' it's fair and reasonable to look at broadly comparable situations.

It's great and romantic to fondly wax-poetic about 'the good old days' .... but the reality is that more often than not the 'goodness' of those days doesn't bear-up to to the reality of scrutiny in light of modern tastes and consumer expectations. In reality 'life' is more complex these days than ever before because consumer expectations are more complex than ever before. In reality, very few people if tossed-back to the vehicles and RVs of the past would find that experience particularly satisfying, and for good reason. IMO.
When I was a 'kid' and my folks graduated from 'pop-ups' to full-sized family RVs, the de-rigeuer family tow vehicle was the massive International Travelall, a pioneer in offering 'comfortable' family travel with great towing capacity; Jeep and GM quickly followed with the Wagoneer and Suburban, making those 'work vehicles' more 'family friendly' in their amenities. Very few folks doing any serious RVing were hitching their family-sized trailers to sedans or even big station wagons in those 'good old' days.
 
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What has ever happened to the days when you had a hitch welded to the family car or station wagon, load both the trailer and car up, assuring both vehicles are semi-level, and then just go? For heavens sake, this is simple matter of just going camping, it is not a space shuttle mission! :rolleyes:

Bill
Lucy and Desi are onboard! This is a funny movie: "The Long, Long Trailer" worth watching for scientific purposes and planning.

I bet there is no tranny cooler in that Merc based on the look of fear in their faces :)

403549

403550
 

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My main point is "back then" folks just loaded up, backed up to their trailer and went camping. Today folks are literally frightened into thinking that they need to spend hours/days/weeks going over specifications, calculating every little item down to the ounce, and then placing that item within an inch so to achieve an exact weight and/or balance. Making sure that they do not "overload" even by a pound or so or they will surely damage their vehicles, crash and die. We have watched people actually doing this ritual while packing up and have have been confronted and chastised ourselves by a couple who watched us eat breakfast, throw everything into the trailer/car, fold up our camper, hook up, and started to head out, chewing us out for our recklessness where we were surely going to cause a life-threatening calamity! I am thinking that it is this type of over-reactiveness that the OP is referring.

We sure do sorely miss the days of "common sense!"

Bill
 

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I’d bet there is a huge tranny cooler inside the huge cold tank of that Merc radiator.

One thing that Merc did not have was onboard TFT data.

Bet it didn’t have a lock-up torque converter either.
 
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