Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Curious how the trim levels will hold their value over time relative to other trim levels of the same year, to decide if a high trim level is a worthy investment. Using KBB trade in value (Good Condition)(Default equipment options)( low miles - 10k miles/year)

There are a lot of variables here like miles/year, options in a given year, and you could also look at percent change from original MRSP.

I would say looking at these numbers, the higher trim packages seem to hold their value enough to buy one. Curious what everyone else thinks.

2006 w/ 100k miles
RT - $7,529
RTS - $8,230
RTL - $8,651
Diff RTL - RT= $1,122 or 14.9% diff

2008 w/ 80K miles
RT - $10,257
RTS - $12,613
RTL - $13,852
Diff RTL - RT= $3,595 or 35% diff

2010 w/ 60k miles
RT - $13,622
RTS - $16,423
RTL - $18,717
Diff RTL - RT = $5,095 or 37% diff

2012 w/ 40k miles
RT - $19,254
RTS - $21,266
RTL - $23,856
Diff RTL - RT = $4,602 or 24% diff

2014 w/ 20k miles
RT - $22,160
RTS - $25,518
RTL - $28,386
Diff RTL - RT = $6,226 or 28%

2017 AWD MSRP
RT - $32,175
RTS - $34,215
RTL - $36,480
RTL T - $38,630
RTL E - $42,270
Diff RTL - RT = $4,305 or 13% diff
Diff RTL T - RT = $6,455 or 20% diff
Diff RTL E - RT = $10,095 or 31% diff


Alternately (assuming MSRP purchase price both times)
2017 RT $32,175 - 2012 RT $19,254 = $12,921 or 40% lost value
2017 RTS $34,215 - 2012 RTS $21,266 = $12,949 or 37% lost value
2017 RTL $36,480 - 2012 RTL $23,856 = $12,624 or 35% lost value
2017 RTL T $38,630 - 2012 RTL $23,856 = $14,744 or 38% lost value
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
I suppose it depends on how well accepted the new model is. If it tanks out of the gate, the trim level probably won't matter much.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,103 Posts
At one time, it seems like I remember reading a Consumer Reports article that suggested the return on higher trim levels on vehicles was similar to that of swimming pools - not very good. I would think it might help a newer model somewhat provided that the extra features were still somewhat current and fully functional. However, as fast as technology becomes outdated these days, a factory navigation system or autonomous driving features may not matter as much to the next buyer five years from now and thus won't bring as much money.

Try this: Using KBB or similar as a guide, pick a 2014 Ridgeline and use "excellent" condition and, say, 20,000 miles as as point of reference. Re-value that same vehicle in each trim level. Compare each result to the original MSRP and see which trim, if any, retained more value. My wild guess is that a lower trim will hold more value than a higher trim, but I could be wrong and that could very well depend on a specific model. For example, some vehicles may be more desirable in lower trims for various reasons such as upgradability and/or reliability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I would think the higher trim levels help a sale and hold their value with one exception. Navigation. Most navigation systems are crap when brand new, add a handful of years on them and they become more crap. Most people I know with built in navigation start relying on their phones after a few years these days, or back in the day they would take the time and money to use a dedicated Garmin type device.

Then again I have never liked the built in navigation and never understood why it was so popular as they always have over charged for it. The always updating phones, or life time maps on Garmins always seemed like the more logical choice.

With that said I don't know how the newer Android/Apple integration work so maybe that has finally allowed for navigation to be worth a damn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
I would think the RTL-e will hold its value the best, as its the only trim with Sensing. Sensing will eventually be standard and some of those feature will be required on all cars in the future. If I was buying a used RL I would want Sensing, verses not getting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
I would think the RTL-e will hold its value the best, as its the only trim with Sensing. Sensing will eventually be standard and some of those feature will be required on all cars in the future. If I was buying a used RL I would want Sensing, verses not getting it.
That's you and your individual preference.

I know multiple people in the industry. You lose the least on the lower trims. The higher the trim the more $ you lose. We have run the numbers multiple times, multiple years, the lower cost trims lose less $.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,141 Posts
I would think the higher trim levels help a sale and hold their value with one exception. Navigation. Most navigation systems are crap when brand new, add a handful of years on them and they become more crap. Most people I know with built in navigation start relying on their phones after a few years these days, or back in the day they would take the time and money to use a dedicated Garmin type device.

Then again I have never liked the built in navigation and never understood why it was so popular as they always have over charged for it. The always updating phones, or life time maps on Garmins always seemed like the more logical choice.

With that said I don't know how the newer Android/Apple integration work so maybe that has finally allowed for navigation to be worth a damn.
The built in Nav systems were popular because of larger screens. They also were better looking than aftermarket units in the vehicle overall . Theft is also a non factor with the built in units you can't steal it or want it. Portable GPS or aftermarket can be stolen out of vehicle and you can never forget and leave the built in unit somewhere else. My 16yr old Nav system in my 2000 3.2 TL still works. It's outdated but most roads are still the same. Larger screen still better than cell phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I'm not sure about investments, but I seem to keep a vehicle for 8-10 years. If I get 8-10 years out of my RTL-E with minimal issues, it will be a good investment for me. I can't imagine buying this truck and opting to exclude the technology. That's part of what has me excited to buy this truck over the other mid sized vehicles.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,103 Posts
The built in Nav systems were popular because of larger screens. They also were better looking than aftermarket units in the vehicle overall . Theft is also a non factor with the built in units you can't steal it or want it. Portable GPS or aftermarket can be stolen out of vehicle and you can never forget and leave the built in unit somewhere else. My 16yr old Nav system in my 2000 3.2 TL still works. It's outdated but most roads are still the same. Larger screen still better than cell phone.
And, factory navigation systems...

...continue to function using dead reckoning if there is a GPS signal loss.

...provide information to the climate control system to compensate for the angle at which solar radiation enters the cabin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
A bit off topic, but unfortunately, my 2010 RL RT was totaled over Mem day weekend thanks to the 2nd time a driver made a terrible left in front of me in 3 years that i had no chance of reacting to... anyway, I was worried after having my front end rebuilt after the first one that the value would plummet, and it definitely did... but since they totaled it, they couldn't care less about the title history. Thus, I got a check for roughly $20k for a RL that I paid about $29 for 6 years ago... that's unreal value retention to me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I like the front end.

With regard to trim levels, my basic, manual, wind up windowed Tacoma is going UP in value.

figure that !

mike
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top