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I have located the reverse wire to connect my backup camera (thanks to a previous post). I wanted to know the correct wire guage for the green wire so that I can order the right size posi-tap. (Like the one in the picture)

Also what's the ground wire from the bunch of wire in the picture?
 

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I have located the reverse wire to connect my backup camera (thanks to a previous post). I wanted to know the correct wire guage for the green wire so that I can order the right size posi-tap. (Like the one in the picture)

Also what's the ground wire from the bunch of wire in the picture?
Posi-Taps are color coded. Blue in the photo = 16 to 18 gauge.
 

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Thanks OhSix!

Also what about the ground wire? While I have the probe, I hate to go through all the 25-30 wires to find it. For testing, I just attached the other end to the body of ridgeline.
 

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I would chassis ground it if it is just for the camera. Try to tap the least amount possible. At least that is my thought process.
 

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You aren't likely to find a ground wire in the bundle coming off the fuse block. Use one to the bolts already tapped into the sheet metal, like the one at the bottom of the fuse block itself, or one of the two mounting the hood release. Use a crimp ring terminal and don't worry about the plastic tabs isolating the connection to the sheet steel itself. As long as you are using the ground for your camera only, the bolt will provide more than enough surface to complete the circuit - we are only worried about a few 100ths of an amp.

BTW: all DC connectors like the Posi-Taps, crimp ons and Scotch Locks are color coded too AWG standards.
 

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Thanks Guys. I did see some bolts there, but was worried about true ground, as they were connecting to plastic brackets. I will use that for ground.

Thanks for the AWG color coding info OhSix. My color coding experience has only been with resistors and they were universal :).

I have to wait for another week as posi-taps were not available in local stores. I read some bad reviews about Scotch Locks. I had to order posi-taps online from Crutchfield. Though, I do not know why they have to charge $7 shipping for $9 posi-taps. The posi-taps are so light weight.
 

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Thanks Guys. I did see some bolts there, but was worried about true ground, as they were connecting to plastic brackets. I will use that for ground.

Thanks for the AWG color coding info OhSix. My color coding experience has only been with resistors and they were universal :).

I have to wait for another week as posi-taps were not available in local stores. I read some bad reviews about Scotch Locks. I had to order posi-taps online from Crutchfield. Though, I do not know why they have to charge $7 shipping for $9 posi-taps. The posi-taps are so light weight.
Mixed reviews and experience with Scotch Locks. Using them in areas outside the cabin is a failure waiting to happen as they corrode when exposed to the elements. In the relatively stable environment of a vehicle interior, they'll last years, maybe even never failing. Personally, I try to avoid as much alteration as possible to factory wires. Trim insulation, wrap, solder and tape is the most reliable.

One thing is for sure, Posi Taps do less damage to wire than Scotch locks but due to their construction, those things are danged expensive.
 

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Amazon does have the positaps and some have free prime shipping. Just got some delivered last night. First time I have used them. They look cool. They are pricy though.
 

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posi taps, t-taps, scotch locks are all junk, buy a set of wire strippers for almost the same price and do it right.
I have to agree. I tried a positap on that wire, and it didn't make a very good connection for me. I ended up just stripping about 3/4" of the outer coating, wrapping the reverse wire around it and soldered/wrapped it. I realize this is a much more permanent connection, but I'm not planning on getting rid of my truck.
 

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I realize this is a much more permanent connection, but I'm not planning on getting rid of my truck.
But also a less potentially problematic connection.
 

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Although I moved away from "professional" installation of mobile electronics as a primary source of income over 2 decades ago, I strongly disagree with the universal classification that scotch locks and posi-taps are "junk". They serve a purpose - and when properly used - perform their duties with admirable reliability. I too have bad experiences with both products but learned in most they are the fault of improper installation - usually due to where they are installed and/or how they are installed.

Examples: when either of these products are installed in a location exposed to the wilds of environmental exposure such as water and sun, the user is accelerating and actually causing eventual failure. And, perhaps more commonly, when either product is used with the incorrect wire gauges, they will fail or cause intermittent issues as a result of the environment and/or vibration.

I can't count how many times troubleshooting problems ranging from trailer lights to power antenna triggers have ended by finding a Blue Tap attempting to join a 20 gauge wire to a 24 gauge wire. "Back in the day", some trailer OEMs even used scotch locks to join wires under the tongue! Chalk that kind of nonsense up to VERY bad quality control. Just git 'er out the door.

Neither of these products are meant to be permanent connection solutions, but that doesn't prevent users from expecting them to be, or using them in inappropriate areas, or joining wires either too large or too small together, then blaming 3M or Posi-tap for the future problems.

Having said that, I agree. The most rugged solution is trimming insulation, wrapping and soldering, then taping the junction. Done enough times by someone who cares, a casual observer would never spot a nicely executed job. Wrapping wire looms in electrical tape is an acquired talent!

Here's a joint job I recently did with a run to the rear of the 06. Can you tell which is factory and which was done 2 weeks ago?

20150627_134919.jpg

When I installed my rear view camera and needed to supply power to it, I didn't like the idea of using a tap OR stripping & soldering the factory reverse wire, so I went a different way.

Can you see the tap?

20150724_111846_1.jpg
 

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Very clean! Nice job.
 
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