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At least in my area, builders are putting 20-22' deep garages even in the McMansions. Most people use them as mancaves or storage rooms and park in their driveways or on the street.
 

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Did you get the split tailgate so you can have the dual action too?
In my mind anyway, I feel RAM with the Ram Boxes and the Split tailgate gives you pretty much the same functionality of the Ridgeline. They also have those storage compartments in the floor, and the available 12 inch screen you can split. All very cool and tempting stuff, I just wish they had an ecoboost like Ford
That Hemi sounds so much better than the EcoBoost, though...

FCA/RAM is supposed to be working on a high-performance Straight Six.... we'll see what happens there...

Straight Six ALWAYS beats V6, except in packaging....
 

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At least in my area, builders are putting 20-22' deep garages even in the McMansions. Most people use them as mancaves or storage rooms and park in their driveways or on the street.
That's because your weather is relatively nice. When it is below zero, both you and your truck will thank you for keeping it in a garage!
 

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That Hemi sounds so much better than the EcoBoost, though...

FCA/RAM is supposed to be working on a high-performance Straight Six.... we'll see what happens there...

Straight Six ALWAYS beats V6, except in packaging....
Indeed! No 3, 4, 5, or 6 will ever sound as pleasing as a V8...because physics - I don't care how much artificial sound they use.

I do quite like the sound of an inline-3, though - it's more than half as good as an inline-6. :)
 

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Back around 1970 there were problems parking the Cadillacs of the time in the garages built in the 50's. It's nice to see we have moved back in that direction!

Steve with a house built in the 2000's but the garage has 9' wide doors so at least the mirrors clear!
 

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You can never have too much garage space. It amazes me that builders often cut corners when it comes to garage space... maybe because most first-time buyers pay little attention to that aspect.
 

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You can never have too much garage space. It amazes me that builders often cut corners when it comes to garage space... maybe because most first-time buyers pay little attention to that aspect.
I only own a home for the garage. I cannot wait to get out of here and buy 20-50 acres and build a bardominium. 4000 sq ft garage with 1400 sq ft living. Rain catchments, solar panels, windmill, well water, berm for shooting, my own MX track! Hopefully with river access.
 

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Ha, i know that feeling! I waiting for years to come across a house that my wife would live in (and I could afford) that had a 2 + 2garage setup. 2 internal to the house to park regular cars in and 2+ workshop area external that i can "stink" up and the wife won't complain (like she did for years when i painted or dumped gas all over the floor or something bad). It's great. And the acreage keeps me away from the neighbors who probably complain anyway about me burning lol.

Steve
 

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I've worked in residential construction as a builder and framing contractor since the mid-90's and it's been interesting to see the evolution of the garage in that relatively short time. In the early-mid '90s a 20'x20' garage with two 8' wide x 7' high doors was a pretty standard feature in any new home. In the late '90s- early '00s they grew to 22' x22' and 9' wide doors became standard. In 2005 the revised American Plywood Association wall bracing standards were adopted in the Residential Building Code and garages had to expand to 24' wide to meet the code with two 9' doors. Big trucks became more popular so we extended the garages to 24' deep and the 24x24 garage became the de-facto standard in the late '00s and it still is today, although the 7' high door has mostly given way to 8' high. So that's the history...

Cars may be getting smaller but SUVs and trucks are getting bigger so the 24x24 garage will soon become another dinosaur. Just did some checking on the web, a 2021 F250/350 king cab long bed truck is 22'-2" long and 8'10" wide with standard mirrors. In a 24x24 garage framed with 2x4s, you'll have 23'4" left after framing and finishes, so you can park your truck with an even 7" at either end(less the thickness of the garage door, which goes on the inside). Better be careful when you hang that tennis ball! And it's 8'-10" wide with standard mirrors so you need to be lined up well when you go through those 9' doors.

You're a little better off if you don't drive a monster truck, a Toyota Tundra is a hair over 19' long and 6'-8" wide so it still fits comfortably and can get through the door at an angle. I've attached a screen cap from a plan we build with a 24' deep drive-under garage, the truck in the drawing is a Tundra.

I'm seeing a trend now to 24x30 detached garages with some expanding to 28' wide so you can have a row of shelves or workbench on the side and still be able to get out and walk around your truck or SUV.

Ain't progress wonderful? ;)

Best and stay safe,
Bill

garage.JPG
 

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In 2005 the revised American Plywood Association wall bracing standards were adopted in the Residential Building Code and garages had to expand to 24' wide to meet the code with two 9' doors.
Either the cities in East Texas haven't adopted that code or our inspectors don't enforce it.
 

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Either the cities in East Texas haven't adopted that code or our inspectors don't enforce it.
They've adopted it, as have pretty much every state since it became the de-facto standard in the late '90s - early '00s. From 'way back in 2001: Texas State Law Library to the current 2015 version: Upcodes.com

Enforcement is up to the individual government agencies and(fortunately) most of the smaller ones still employ common sense in their decisions. Personally, I consider this standard as one of the more asinine inclusions in the IRC(and there are many more), I've framed literally hundreds of 22' wide garages with 9' doors and never had one blow over in anything less than a tornado.
I totally support building codes but our society has become so risk-averse that they've become onerous. I have a customer who calculated that the increase in codes has added an additional 30% in cost to build a house(in real dollars) since he started building in the early '90s. And he's what I consider one of the "good builders", he cares about the quality of his product and wants his customers to be happy for however long they own one of his homes.

Sorry, got on the soapbox again.... :( But you get the idea...

Best and stay safe,
Bill
 

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My house was built in 1973. Fortunately, it has a three-car garage, which equates to two cars nowadays, along with some room for a couple small freezers, workbench, snow thrower, wood chipper, shop vac, air compressor, winter tires, etc. BTW, everything was built 24" o.c., including the low-pitch roof - invested in a roof rake for extra winter insurance. I also doubled up the deck joists to 12" o.c and upgraded the 4x4 posts to 6x6 (along with some other upgrades) so that I could put the hot tub on it.

I will re-iterate that a wise builder, a wise seller and a wise buyer would all profit from an oversized garage. It shouldn't cost that much more for another six or eight feet and would be money well spent for the buyer who knows what to look for in a garage.

I have never heard anyone say they wished they had a smaller garage, but everyone wishes for a larger garage. I'd happily give up 64sf less lawn to mow for a bigger garage! ;)
 

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Our house design in 1996 had a 22x21.5 foot toy garage. We liked the rest of it so made some changes in the design before it was built. In essence we roughly doubled the square footage to about 900 sq. ft. with a 3rd stall (almost 37 feet deep) and enough length out the front to add a stairway to the basement from the garage in front of the cars (which saved me MUCH grief from having to go through the family room to the inside basement stairs the house came with. It can hold 4 cars with 2 end to end in the 3rd stall. The doors are 7' high (many go higher these days) and a 16 footer wide and a 9 footer. I still had to put a 10x12 shed out back for the summer stuff and wish I had made it the garage a little wider and higher inside for a car lift. Like horsepower, too much garage is never enough!

I have to agree with zroger73 about the V8 sound. Having grown up in the 60s, the sound of a V8 can't be matched by any other configuration of cylinders IMO. Thus my eternal smile jumping into the Hellcat go pedal or even just starting it up. Unfortunately that car will be starting it's winter nap later today. We've had about 30 inches of snow to date and the salt is starting to come out.
 
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