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Premium Member
2022 WBE
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That's why I said I dump it at my local auto parts store if I don't need it.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Each time this comes up I feel sad for anyone who uses drain washers

Each time I turn 5,000 miles I vacuum out 5 quarts of oil and replace, change oil filter

Each time I turn 10,000 miles I vacuum out 3 quarts transmission fluid and fill through the dipstick hole

Each time I turn 20,000 miles I vacuum out through the level plug both differentials on my Ridgeline or just the rear differential on my S2000, and top up, and vacuum out and refill brake and clutch reservoirs on all my vehicles for the last 50 years.

works for me as I can read an odometer on any vehicle even not knowing it’s maintenance history
So you NEVER check the mag plugs for debris (trans and rear diff)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Okay, we kinda got sidetracked here a bit. The so-called crush~washer doesn’t actually get crushed, the oil drain bolt merely is snugged down, & lightly torqued. It’s not really a crush washer, it’s more akin to a flat metal washer.
The washer doesn’t seal anything, that’s the bolt & bolt-face incorporated washers job. The washer doesn’t seal the oil pan drain outlet. So it seems to me that my original observation stands. The washer is mostly a drain plug distance limiter so that the drain plug doesn’t go all the way in to avoid stripping the oil pan outlet.
 

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2019 RTL-E Black and Low
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As far as checking magnetic drain plugs if I am under the car or truck for other reasons or if curious and near an oil change of course I check.

Yet with many vehicles in my 50 years driving including 22 as a professional mechanic and service manager and working in vehicle design and testing as part of my undergraduate and graduate career never has magnetic debris alerted me to an issue. At best it confirmed a suspicion based on other information.

If something seems wrong check, but if not change fluids with as minimal mechanical intervention as possible.

I have seen many more ruined engines and gear boxes from drain plugs or oil change errors than most other problems excepting not checking levels or looking at leaks.

I beat my vehicles and obsessively observe them
They are my hobby and torment
 

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Okay, we kinda got sidetracked here a bit. The so-called crush~washer doesn’t actually get crushed, the oil drain bolt merely is snugged down, & lightly torqued. It’s not really a crush washer, it’s more akin to a flat metal washer.
The washer doesn’t seal anything, that’s the bolt & bolt-face incorporated washers job. The washer doesn’t seal the oil pan drain outlet. So it seems to me that my original observation stands. The washer is mostly a drain plug distance limiter so that the drain plug doesn’t go all the way in to avoid stripping the oil pan outlet.
I think you are trolling now.
 

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2017 RTL
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Yea... it is a sealing washer. Let's take a moment to think about the drain bolt. It's hard. Harder than the oil pan. So, if you put the drain plug in without the sealing washer, you can damage the drain pan. You'll actually have to so you don't seep oil. That's bad. So you don't do this, you use a sealing washer. This washer acts to deform slightly to sandwich between the drain bolt and oil pan. This creates a nice tight gap free interface so oil doesn't seep. This is good! Certainly worthy of having this part in a design.

This sealing washer is most certainly not just a spacer. That would not be done by an engineer in this kind of application. They'd be questioned in a design review.

Some cars use an actual crush washer. Our 16 Forester is an example. When I tighten that oil drain plug, I tighten until the washer crushes, then stop. For the Ridgeline, we use a torque wrench.

Oil filters, we usually use OE, Purolator, or Wix. But I'm not convinced it's really that important.
 

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2019 Sport Lunar Silver
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Okay, we kinda got sidetracked here a bit. The so-called crush~washer doesn’t actually get crushed, the oil drain bolt merely is snugged down, & lightly torqued. It’s not really a crush washer, it’s more akin to a flat metal washer.
The washer doesn’t seal anything, that’s the bolt & bolt-face incorporated washers job. The washer doesn’t seal the oil pan drain outlet. So it seems to me that my original observation stands. The washer is mostly a drain plug distance limiter so that the drain plug doesn’t go all the way in to avoid stripping the oil pan outlet.
24 years working on Honda only, factory trained. (Long retired) I've done hundreds of services, seen it all. If the "Crush washer" doesn't actually get crushed, why does it take on the shape of both mating surfaces?
I disagree with you, based on personal experience. But I realize in the big picture, does it really matter?
 

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2020 RTL-E in pacific pewter metallic
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Took the OEM washer out when I installed the Fumoto drain. That has been about 400,000 miles ago. Anyone need an OEM crush washer?
 

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2014 Sport
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As far as checking magnetic drain plugs if I am under the car or truck for other reasons or if curious and near an oil change of course I check.

Yet with many vehicles in my 50 years driving including 22 as a professional mechanic and service manager and working in vehicle design and testing as part of my undergraduate and graduate career never has magnetic debris alerted me to an issue. At best it confirmed a suspicion based on other information.

If something seems wrong check, but if not change fluids with as minimal mechanical intervention as possible.

I have seen many more ruined engines and gear boxes from drain plugs or oil change errors than most other problems excepting not checking levels or looking at leaks.

I beat my vehicles and obsessively observe them
They are my hobby and torment
Just one comment here. Certainly one of the purposes of the magnetic drain plug is to collect particles that might otherwise damage the engine / transmission etc. If the plug is never removed and cleaned, then won't those harmful particles be less likely to be captured?
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
24 years working on Honda only, factory trained. (Long retired) I've done hundreds of services, seen it all. If the "Crush washer" doesn't actually get crushed, why does it take on the shape of both mating surfaces?
I disagree with you, based on personal experience. But I realize in the big picture, does it really matter?
The Honda oil drain plug system seems a bit odd. Like all the comments & advice here but other vehicles I service use a drain bolt with a rubberized integrated washer, or just a bolt with a washer built in.

The washer on the Honda system appears to get lightly torqued between the bolt & the pan, but not excessively. But there is room for leakage as the washer goes over the bolt head but is an easy slip-on fit. Perhaps the whole system is benefitted by the extra long bolt & corresponding long internal pan thread?
It also seems that with the light torque on the bolt, the washer could easily be reused a couple times…..
 

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I liked the drain plug on my '99 Regal - it had a built-in rubber O-ring and was reusable.
Looks like many GM engines use that. Saw a newer Camaro with the same type and the tech just reused it.
My 2010 Corvette has the same thing, although it has 2 drain plugs...dry sump oil system that has 10.5 quarts of oil.
 

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2009 RTS Bali Blue Pearl
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Why are so many worried about something that just plain works. Never had a leak or problem with a crush washer on any Honda vehicle, that includes all the other gear cases that use them. I replace them sometimes but reuse them a lot. To be honest, the first time I changed oil on a Honda I was doubtful of that crush washer sealing.

I've had problems years back with other mfgs. oil drain plugs leaking because of being over torqued or age. I remember having to fabricate new washers to get them to seal.
 

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2020 RTL-E in pacific pewter metallic
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It's why I use the Fumoto. If I just changed oil at my regular interval it would have involved screwing that drain plug in 60 times. In an aluminum pan there will be wear, Maybe even requre a new pan. I'ts exactly why I use the Fumoto, no more wear on the poor aluminum threads.

At my age, I have graduated from changing my own oil.
 

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2021 RTL-E, Lunar Silver Metallic
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Reading through this thread I saw several individuals state to lightly torque the oil drain plug. There is actually a specification stated in the OM. My 2021 OM states 30 lb-ft while the 2017 OM stated 29 lb-ft. 30 and 29 are quite similar, but in my interpretation, tighter than "lightly".
 

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2022 RTL-E + HPD Bronze
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The poster on a door near the Honda Parts department near me says oil filters are $9.00. Actual price was $18.00 including tax & a freebee crush washer. Some here in the forum claim the A02 filter to just be average, so why not try a different one? For example, I run a $9.95 Valvoline canister filter (I buy from Ford!) in my car rather than the GM/Chev $22.00 filter. Here are a couple of choices I found available for my Ridgeline that I welcome comments on:
Bosch 72226WS
ACDelco PF2057
MotorCraft FL816
Fram PH7317

I’m also finding the so-called crush washer puzzling. Aluminum or steel, the washer neither crushes or seals the oil pan. To me it looks like just a spacer so the oil pan bolt doesn’t go in too far. Plus the oil pan bolt doesn’t get torqued enough to damage or “crush” it. Why not just re-use it? Why steel over aluminum or vice-versa?
Thoughts?
I've re-used oil pan crush washers many many times with ZERO problems. Always cracks me up when people are all "... and don't forget to replace that crush washer or the plug will immediatly purge all the oil and the Kraken will eat your rig whole..."

Also, if you go on YouTube and watch some of the oil filter comparison tests, the Wix filters always stack up very well against the competition for not a lot of $$.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Bottom line, it's best practice to replace the sealing washers. OTOH, it's not the end of the world if you reuse them either.
 
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